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This reproducible example is a very simplified version of my code:

x <- c(NaN, 2, 3)

#This is fine, as expected
max(x)
> NaN

#Why does na.rm remove NaN?
max(x, na.rm=TRUE) 
> 3

To me, NA (missing value) and NaN (not a number) are two completely different entities, why does na.rm remove NaN? How can I ignore NA and not NaN?

ps:I am using 64-bit R version 3.0.0 on Windows7.

Edit: Upon some more study I found that is.na returns true for NaN too! This is the cause of confusion for me.

is.na(NaN)
> TRUE
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's a language decision:

> is.na(NaN)
[1] TRUE

is.nan differentiates:

> is.nan(NaN)
[1] TRUE
> is.nan(NA)
[1] FALSE

So you may need to call both.

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Yes, I just noticed this behaviour. My idea of missing value needs to change. –  Nishanth Apr 16 '13 at 3:55
    
@e4e5f4 I probably would not have chosen this behavior, were I designing the language. But it is what it is. –  Matthew Lundberg Apr 16 '13 at 3:56
1  
It is interesting to note that the help for sum states that na.rm = TRUE will remove both NaN and NA (whereas ?Extremes) does not. –  mnel Apr 16 '13 at 4:02
1  
Also of interest: class(NA) == "logical"; class(NaN) == "numeric". –  neilfws Apr 16 '13 at 4:12
    
@neilfws That's a convenience, and another language decision. Try class(NA_real_). –  Matthew Lundberg Apr 16 '13 at 4:14
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na.rm arguments in functions generally use is.na() or an analogous function.
And since is.na(NaN) == TRUE, you then get the behavior you're observing.

Now should NaN be treated as also NA? That is a different question ;)


The best way around this is to explicitly tell R how to handle NaN One example:

ifelse(any(is.nan(x)), NaN, min(x, na.rm=TRUE))
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