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I design my emails with the general styling rules outlined elsewhere on the web (i.e. Campaign Montior's CSS guide http://www.campaignmonitor.com/css/) and apply only inline styles (I find this more reliable than placing them in the <head> section as some clients ignore <style>).

Does anyone know if there is a reliable way to effectively reset styles in most major email clients (Outlook 2007 and up, Gmail, Thunderbird, etc)? Something to cover at least the major desktop and mobile clients (http://emailclientmarketshare.com/). Ideally a solution that can be easily applied retroactively to existing HTML email templates would be great.

I am thinking along the lines of what we would use for the web like Eric Meyer's reset.css (http://meyerweb.com/eric/tools/css/reset/) or likewise. Of course we cannot import external CSS rules as we would a regular web page.

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<body style="margin: 0; padding: 0;"></body> will do the job –  Mr. Alien Apr 16 '13 at 4:01
    
Thanks - that's great for layout and padding but I also want to address fonts, text-decoration and type size. –  rwcorbett Apr 16 '13 at 4:03
    
You could take reset.css and apply all the rules manually using inline style attributes. –  icktoofay Apr 16 '13 at 4:12
    
@rwcorbett You need to make it all inline –  Mr. Alien Apr 16 '13 at 4:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The HTML Boilerplate is probably the closest thing you'll find. It's well commented and resets as much as is possible with html emails.

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Nice, didn't know this existed! –  Rick Kuipers Apr 16 '13 at 6:28
    
Thanks - I have seen this in the wild before but now I have a definite reason to try it out. AFAIK this is our best solution until mail clients advance past XHTML 1.0 specs. –  rwcorbett Apr 16 '13 at 15:32
    
Which is not happening any time soon! Outlook is still too popular and doesn't update like the web clients. I can see people still running Microsoft Word powered Outlook versions for another 10+ years... –  John Apr 16 '13 at 16:11

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