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This code:

try {
  try {
    throw 1;
  } catch (e, s) {
    print("$e $s");
    throw e;
  }
} catch (e2, s2) {
  print("$e2 $s2");    
}

prints:

1 #0      main (file:///.../test.dart:34:7)

1 #0      main (file:///.../test.dart:37:7)

So the original stack trace is completely lost. Is there any way to rethrow with the stack trace preserved?

share|improve this question
    
What happens if you just rethrow? – Ladicek Apr 16 '13 at 4:28
    
@Ladicek, is there a rethrow keyword in Dart? I can't find evidence of it online, and my Dart installation doesn't understand it. – Nadine Rivka Whittle Apr 16 '13 at 5:15
    
@DarshanComputing See chapter 12.8.1 of the spec. – Ladicek Apr 16 '13 at 7:17
    
@Ladicek Ah, I found it, thanks. Interesting that it's not a keyword, and it's currently implemented using throw. – Nadine Rivka Whittle Apr 16 '13 at 7:34
    
@DarshanComputing It used to be just throw, but it was changed to rethrow some time ago. – Ladicek Apr 16 '13 at 13:05
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Current versions of the Dart VM and dart2js support rethrowing, preserving the stack trace, with rethrow:

void main() {
  try {
    try {
      throw 1;
    } catch (e, s) {
      print("$e $s");
      rethrow;
    }
  } catch (e2, s2) {
    print("$e2 $s2");    
  }
}

This produces:

1 #0      main (file:///home/darshan/so/stacktrace.dart:4:7)

1 #0      main (file:///home/darshan/so/stacktrace.dart:4:7)
#1      main (file:///home/darshan/so/stacktrace.dart:7:7)
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks Darshan! – Justin Fagnani Apr 16 '13 at 16:50
    
So - the difference is that you just throw and @JustinFagnani is doing throw e ? – Jasper Apr 17 '13 at 6:22
    
@Jasper Yes, throw e; is a normal throw, while throw; is the current way of writing rethrow;. – Nadine Rivka Whittle Apr 17 '13 at 16:16

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