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I have a file which shall have lines like,

<tag host="xyz|abc" some info />
<tag host="ijk,cdf" some info />

I'm getting the information of the host by using pattern matching and I'd like to split the value of the host. For some reason the following code doesn't seem to work for comma even though it looks correct.

if($line =~ m/(\s\S)*host=\"(\S+)\"(\s\S)*/)
{
($val) = ($2);
$val=~tr/!$()//ds;
my @values;
if($val =~ m/((\S+)\|(\S+))*/ )
{
    @values=split('\|',$val);
}
else
{
@values=split(',',$val);
}
#Perform some action on Values.
}

Can any one help me with this ? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
What does your input look like? –  squiguy Apr 16 '13 at 4:08
1  
Why break it into an if-else? Why not just split on the comma or pipe (e.g. split /[,\|]/,$val;)? –  vol7ron Apr 16 '13 at 4:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No need of if-else in your code. You can combine the conditions into one line -code.

Change your code like this :

use strict;
use warnings;

if($line =~ m/(\s\S)*host=\"(\S+)\"(\s\S)*/)
{
($val) = ($2);
$val=~tr/!$()//ds;
my @values;
@values = split (/[,|]/,$val);
#Perform some action on Values.
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Of course, that code won't compile under strict as it is. And the captures $1 and $3 look unneccessary → /host="([^"]+)"/ would be a better regex. That split regex will have interesting consequences on input like host="xyz|abc,def". Limiting the resulting fragments to two with a third argument to split might be a good idea. –  amon Apr 16 '13 at 5:04
    
Thanks a lot Kute. –  Ambi Apr 16 '13 at 5:29
    
No need to escape the pipe in a character class –  Borodin Apr 16 '13 at 5:33
    
I have one more issue with the same code. I'm checking if each value is present in an arraylist and if not I'm taking an action based on that. if(!grep($_,@hosts_ignore_list) { #Perform an Operation } This also doesn't seem to work. @hosts_ignore_list contains an element called dummy. But the condition always evaluates to false since grep function returns the entire array in case it doesn't find the particular string. –  Ambi Apr 16 '13 at 5:41

A few ideas:

  • use strict, use warnings and some indentation would be nice :)

  • Where you wrote (\s\S) I presume you are familiar with JavaScript and meant the character class [\s\S]? There is no need to match the text preceding and following the parts you are interested in

  • The /s modifier on tr/// is superfluous in conjunction with /d

  • Far easier to just collect all substrings of characters that are neither pipe nor comma

Here is how I would have written it

use strict;
use warnings;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    if ($line =~ m/host="(\S+)"/) {
        (my $href = $1) =~ tr/!$()//d;
        my @values = $href =~ /[^,|]+/g;
        print "@values\n";
    }
}

__DATA__
<tag host="xyz|abc" some info />
<tag host="ijk,cdf" some info />

output

xyz abc
ijk cdf
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