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Below two scenario give me the same behavior. But What is the difference technically? (I put the below code in the last section of script tags in the body.)

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('.collapse').collapse({toggle: false});

  $(document).on('click', '#expandAllLessons', function() {
    $('div.accordion-body').collapse('show');
  });

  $(document).on('click', '#collapseAllLessons', function() {
    $('div.accordion-body.collapse').collapse('hide');
  });
});

or

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('.collapse').collapse({toggle: false});
});

$(document).on('click', '#expandAllLessons', function() {
  $('div.accordion-body').collapse('show');
});
$(document).on('click', '#collapseAllLessons', function() {
  $('div.accordion-body.collapse').collapse('hide');
});

Thanks.

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2  
A better place to start with :- api.jquery.com/ready –  Pranav Apr 16 '13 at 4:26

3 Answers 3

More or less, it's doing the same thing.

With the use of .on() with a child selector, you're using event delegation to bind any future events to any elements that match that selector. document is the very tippy top of the DOM tree (and available upon script execution), so your event delegation works.

.ready() waits until the DOM has assembled, so you can, more reliably, directly bind events using methods like .click(), .hover(), etc.

So your first example is just waiting for the DOM to assemble, then delegating the event. The second example is just delegating the event immediately upon script execution.

From jQuery's documentation regarding .on():

Direct and delegated events

The majority of browser events bubble, or propagate, from the deepest, innermost element (the event target) in the document where they occur all the way up to the body and the document element. In Internet Explorer 8 and lower, a few events such as change and submit do not natively bubble but jQuery patches these to bubble and create consistent cross-browser behavior.

If selector is omitted or is null, the event handler is referred to as direct or directly-bound. The handler is called every time an event occurs on the selected elements, whether it occurs directly on the element or bubbles from a descendant (inner) element.

When a selector is provided, the event handler is referred to as delegated. The handler is not called when the event occurs directly on the bound element, but only for descendants (inner elements) that match the selector. jQuery bubbles the event from the event target up to the element where the handler is attached (i.e., innermost to outermost element) and runs the handler for any elements along that path matching the selector.

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Whenever you do a function, regardless of whether it's $(document).ready(function(){}); or something else, all the contents inside that function can only read stuff that's at its level or above it (unless you're using return functions).

The top paragraph means that all your code won't be executed until it's loaded, but it also means that it's nested code. Nested code means certain variables and functions won't be readable from outside. Example:

function bob(){
  function sandy(){
    function joe(){
      alert("I can access anything written by sandy, bob or ray!");

    }
  }
}

function ray(){
   alert("I can't see anything from anybody but bob!");
}
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Look at the comments first. After jQuery 1.7 on can delegate events as well:

"The .on() method attaches event handlers to the currently selected set of elements in the jQuery object. As of jQuery 1.7, the .on() method provides all functionality required for attaching event handlers. For help in converting from older jQuery event methods, see .bind(), .delegate(), and .live()."

So before jQuery 1.7 this is the correct answer:

First is better because, document ready event is triggered when HTML document is fully loaded to DOM. And then you're sure you have all elements in place, and you can bind events to them.

But if you bind event before loading '#expandAllLessons' element to DOM, then it will simply not work, as jQuery selector will not find any elements, and will not bind this event anywhere.

After 1.7 both will work almost in the same way. Almost, because in first case, when you trigger event before document will be ready, it will not be executed. In second example it will be executed, because it was attached when script was loaded.

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3  
-1 He's using event delegation, so he does not need the document to be ready. Had he used direct binding, you'd be right. –  Matthew Blancarte Apr 16 '13 at 4:33
    
Thanks @MatthewBlancarte, that you've added comment after -1. But I can partially agree with you: "As of jQuery 1.7, the .live() method is deprecated. Use .on() to attach event handlers." But I'm pretty sure, that before 1.7 on wasn't working like delegate. –  Carlos Apr 16 '13 at 4:36
    
@MatthewBlancarte - I've changed my answer because of your comment. Thanks - I didn't know they've changed this behavior. –  Carlos Apr 16 '13 at 4:45

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