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How do I implement a copy constructor for a class that has a unique_ptr member variable? I am only considering C++11.

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4  
Well, what do you want the copy constructor to do? –  Nicol Bolas Apr 16 '13 at 6:23
    
I read that unique_ptr is uncopyable. This makes me wonder how do use a class that has a unique_ptr member variable in a std::vector. –  codefx Apr 16 '13 at 6:28
    
I think after copy if we have 2 objects with unique pointers pointing to same location(object) then does that make sense? They should be unique. If a class with pointer implements copy constructor then that pointer should be shared pointer, I believe not an unique pointer. –  Abhijit Kadam Apr 16 '13 at 6:38
    
@AbhijitKadam You can make a deep copy of the content of the unique_ptr. In fact, that's often the sensible thing to do. –  Cubic Apr 16 '13 at 11:24
    
Yes that makes sense. Saw the soln by Daniel. –  Abhijit Kadam Apr 16 '13 at 11:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Since the unique_ptr can not be shared, you need to either deep-copy it's content or convert the unique_ptr to a shared_ptr.

class A
{
   std::unique_ptr< int > up_;

public:
   A( int i ) : up_( new int( i ) ) {}
   A( const A& a ) : up_( new int( *a.up_ ) ) {}
};

int main()
{
   A a( 42 );
   A b = a;
}

You can, as NPE mentioned, use a move-ctor instead of a copy-ctor but that would result in different semantics of your class. A move-ctor would need to make the member as moveable explicitly via std::move:

A( A&& a ) : up_( std::move( a.up_ ) ) {}

Having a complete set of the necessary operators also leads to

A& operator=( const A& a )
{
   up_.reset( new int( *a.up_ ) );
   return *this,
}

A& operator=( A&& a )
{
   up_ = std::move( a.up_ );
   return *this,
}

If you want to use your class in a std::vector, you basically have to decide if the vector shall be the unique owner of an object, in which case it would be sufficient to make the class moveable, but not copyable. If you leave out the copy-ctor and copy-assignment, the compiler will guide your way on how to use a std::vector with move-only types.

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1  
Might be worth mentioning move constructors? –  NPE Apr 16 '13 at 6:25
    
@NPE Yes, edited. Thanks! –  Daniel Frey Apr 16 '13 at 6:30
2  
+1, but the move constructor should be emphasized even more. In a comment, the OP says the goal is to use the object in a vector. For that, move construction and move assignment are the only things required. –  jogojapan Apr 16 '13 at 6:31
1  
@codefx Shouldn't it be the rule of 5? –  Alex Chamberlain Apr 16 '13 at 6:57
5  
As a warning, the above strategy works for simple types like int. If you have a unique_ptr<Base> that stores a Derived, the above will slice. –  Yakk Apr 16 '13 at 18:35

Daniel Frey mention about copy solution,I would talk about how to move the unique_ptr

class A
{
  public:
    A() : a_(new int(33))

    A(A &&data) : a_(std::move(data.a_))
    {
    }

    A& operator=(A &&data)
    {
      a_ = std::move(data.a_);
      return *this;
    }

  private:
    std::unique_ptr<int> a_;
};

They are called move constructor and move assignment

you could use them like this

int main()
{
  A a;
  A b(std::move(a)); //this will call move constructor, transfer the resource of a to b

  A c;
  a = std::move(c); //this will call move assignment, transfer the resource of c to a

}

You need to wrap a and c by std::move because they have a name std::move is telling the compiler to transform the value to rvalue reference whatever the parameters are In technical sense, std::move is analogy to something like "std::rvalue"

After moving, the resource of the unique_ptr is transfer to another unique_ptr

There are many topics that document rvalue reference; this is a pretty easy one to begin with.

C++ primer 5, ch13 also give a very good explanation about how to "move" the object

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Try this helper to create deep copies, and cope when the source unique_ptr is null.

    template< class T >
    std::unique_ptr<T> copy_unique(const std::unique_ptr<T>& source)
    {
        return source ? std::make_unique<T>(*source) : nullptr;
    }

Eg:

class My
{
    My( const My& rhs )
        : member( copy_unique(rhs.member) )
    {
    }

    // ... other methods

private:
    std::unique_ptr<SomeType> member;
};
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