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I have a simple Java class as shown below:

public class Test {

    private String s;

    public String foo() {
        try {
            s = "dev";
            return s;
        } 
        finally {
            s = "override variable s";
            System.out.println("Entry in finally Block");  
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] xyz) {
        Test obj = new Test();
        System.out.println(obj.foo());
    }
}

And the output of this code is this:

Entry in finally Block
dev  

Why is s not overridden in the finally block, yet control printed output?

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9  
you should put the return statement on the finally block, repeat with me, finally block is always executed –  Juan Antonio Gomez Moriano Apr 16 '13 at 7:12
1  
in try block it return s –  Dev Apr 16 '13 at 7:12
3  
The order of statements matters. You are returning s before you change it's value. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 16 '13 at 7:27
6  
But, you can return the new value in the finally block, unlike in C# (which you cannot) –  Alvin Wong Apr 16 '13 at 7:46
3  
Related: does return "happen after" finally –  Alvin Wong Apr 16 '13 at 9:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 145 down vote accepted

The try block completes with the execution of the return statement and the value of s at the time the return statement executes is the value returned by the method. The fact that the finally clause later changes the value of s (after the return statement completes) does not (at that point) change the return value.

Note that the above deals with changes to the value of s itself in the finally block, not to the object that s references. If s was a reference to a mutable object (which String is not) and the contents of the object were changed in the finally block, then those changes would be seen in the returned value.

The detailed rules for how all this operates can be found in Section 14.20.2 of the Java Language Specification. Note that execution of a return statement counts as an abrupt termination of the try block (the section starting "If execution of the try block completes abruptly for any other reason R...." applies). See Section 14.17 of the JLS for why a return statement is an abrupt termination of a block.

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If i use StringBuilder class instead of String than append some value in finally block,its changes the return value.why? –  Dev Apr 17 '13 at 13:05
4  
@dev - I discuss that in the second paragraph of my answer. In the situation you describe, the finally block does not change what object is returned (the StringBuilder) but it can change the internals of the object. The finally block executes before the method actually returns (even though the return statement has finished), so those changes occur before the calling code sees the returned value. –  Ted Hopp Apr 17 '13 at 14:08
    
try with List, you get same behavior like StringBuilder. –  yogesh prajapati Jul 2 '13 at 5:52
    
@yogeshprajapati - Yep. The same is true with any mutable return value (StringBuilder, List, Set, ad nauseum): if you change the contents in the finally block, then those changes are seen in the calling code when the method finally exits. –  Ted Hopp Jul 2 '13 at 6:14
    
This says what happens, it doesn't say why (would be particularly useful if it pointed to where this was covered in the JLS). –  T.J. Crowder Nov 10 '13 at 18:56

Because the return value is put on the stack before the call to finally.

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3  
That's true, but it doesn't address the OP's question as to why the returned string didn't change. That has to do with string immutability and references versus objects more than pushing the return value on the stack. –  templatetypedef Apr 17 '13 at 4:27
    
Both issues are related. –  Tordek Apr 17 '13 at 4:43
    
@templatetypedef even if String were mutable, using = would not mutate it. –  Owen Apr 17 '13 at 15:00
    
@Owen - I think you are confusing variables with memory objects they refer. = does not mutate a string, it assigns a reference to a different memory object. Mutability is a property of values (garbage collected memory objects), not variables referring to them. –  Saul Apr 19 '13 at 6:45
    
@Saul - Owen's point (which is correct) was that immutability has nothing to do with why OP's finally block did not affect the return value. I think that what templatetypedef might have been getting at (although this isn't clear) is that because the returned value is a reference to a immutable object, even changing the code in the finally block (other than using another return statement) could not affect the value returned from the method. –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 15:15

If we look inside bytecode, we'll notice that JDK has made a significant optimization, and foo() method looks like:

String tmp = null;
try {
    s = "dev"
    tmp = s;
    s = "override variable s";
    return tmp;
} catch (RuntimeException e){
    s = "override variable s";
    throw e;
}

And bytecode:

0:  ldc #7;         //loading String "dev"
2:  putstatic   #8; //storing it to a static variable
5:  getstatic   #8; //loading "dev" from a static variable
8:  astore_0        //storing "dev" to a temp variable
9:  ldc #9;         //loading String "override variable s"
11: putstatic   #8; //setting a static variable
14: aload_0         //loading a temp avariable
15: areturn         //returning it
16: astore_1
17: ldc #9;         //loading String "override variable s"
19: putstatic   #8; //setting a static variable
22: aload_1
23: athrow

java preserved "dev" string from being changed before returning. In fact here is no finally block at all.

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There are 2 things noteworthy here:

  • Strings are immutable. When you set s to "override variable s", you set s to refer to the inlined String, not altering the inherent char buffer of the s object to change to "override variable s".
  • You put a reference to the s on the stack to return to the calling code. Afterwards (when the finally block runs), altering the reference should not do anything for the return value already on the stack.
share|improve this answer
1  
so if i take stringbuffer than sting will be overridden?? –  Dev Apr 16 '13 at 7:20
9  
@dev - If you were to change the content of the buffer in the finally clause, that would be seen in the calling code. However, if you assigned a new stringbuffer to s, then the behavior would be the same as now. –  Ted Hopp Apr 16 '13 at 7:21
    
yes if i append in string buffer in finally block changes reflect on output. –  Dev Apr 16 '13 at 7:30
    
@0xCAFEBABE you also give very good answer and concepts,i highly thank full to you. –  Dev Apr 17 '13 at 5:13

I change your code a bit to prove the point of Ted.

As you can see in the output s is indeed changed but after the return.

public class Test {

public String s;

public String foo() {

    try {
        s = "dev";
        return s;
    } finally {
        s = "override variable s";
        System.out.println("Entry in finally Block");

    }
}

public static void main(String[] xyz) {
    Test obj = new Test();
    System.out.println(obj.foo());
    System.out.println(obj.s);
}
}

Output:

Entry in finally Block 
dev 
override variable s
share|improve this answer
    
why overridden string s not return. –  Dev Apr 16 '13 at 7:27
2  
As Ted and Tordek already did say "the return value is put on the stack before the finally is executed" –  Frank Apr 16 '13 at 8:05
    
While this is good additional information, I'm reluctant to upvote it, because it does not (on its own) answer the question. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 16 '13 at 9:29

Technically speaking, the return in the try block won't be ignored if a finally block is defined, only if that finally block also includes a return.

It's a dubious design decision that was probably a mistake in retrospect (much like references being nullable/mutable by default, and, according to some, checked exceptions). In many ways this behaviour is exactly consistent with the colloquial understanding of what finally means - "no matter what happens beforehand in the try block, always run this code." Hence if you return true from a finally block, the overall effect must always to be to return s, no?

In general, this is seldom a good idiom, and you should use finally blocks liberally for cleaning up/closing resources but rarely if ever return a value from them.

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Try this: If you want to print the override value of s.

finally {
    s = "override variable s";    
    System.out.println("Entry in finally Block");
    return s;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
it gives warning.. finally block does not complete normally –  Dev Apr 16 '13 at 7:16

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