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i have a function in python, which is programmed recursive in a list comprehension. But i don't understand it clearly what really happens in it!

def permut(s,l):
    if l == []: return [[s]]
    return [ e + [l[0]] for e in permut(s, l[1:])] + [l+[s]]

The function gets two arguments, firstly a String and the second a list and it returns the permutation of the String in the list.

permut('a', [1,2,3])
[['a', 3, 2, 1], [3, 'a', 2, 1], [2, 3, 'a', 1], [1, 2, 3, 'a']]

Can someone explain, what happens in the list comprehension?

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What is a from the recursive call? –  gg.kaspersky Apr 16 '13 at 7:23
    
Yes you're right Tim P. –  T.C. Apr 16 '13 at 7:27
    
What are you really trying to do? Is it your own code? If not, are you trying to fix something wrong with it, or simply understand it? –  Karl Knechtel Apr 16 '13 at 9:50
    
I want to understand, what happens in the list comprehension exactly? –  T.C. Apr 16 '13 at 12:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the list comprehension syntax is throwing you off, you can rewrite this function as follows and add some debug print()s along the way:

def permut(s,l):
    print("Entering function permut()")
    print("Parameters:\ns: {}\nl: {}".format(s,l))
    if l == []: 
        print("End of recursion reached, returning {}".format([[s]]))
        return [[s]]
    result = []
    for e in permut(s, l[1:]):
        result.append(e + [l[0]])
    result += [l + [s]]
    print("Returning {}".format(result))
    return result

This is the output you get:

>>> permut('a', [1,2,3])
Entering function permut()
Parameters:
s: a
l: [1, 2, 3]
Entering function permut()
Parameters:
s: a
l: [2, 3]
Entering function permut()
Parameters:
s: a
l: [3]
Entering function permut()
Parameters:
s: a
l: []
End of recursion reached, returning [['a']]
Returning [['a', 3], [3, 'a']]
Returning [['a', 3, 2], [3, 'a', 2], [2, 3, 'a']]
Returning [['a', 3, 2, 1], [3, 'a', 2, 1], [2, 3, 'a', 1], [1, 2, 3, 'a']]
[['a', 3, 2, 1], [3, 'a', 2, 1], [2, 3, 'a', 1], [1, 2, 3, 'a']]
share|improve this answer
    
Not really, what takes the variable e for a value always?? –  T.C. Apr 16 '13 at 7:30
    
@T.C. it iterates over the return value of permut(s, l[1:]), meaning first it is ['a', 3, 2, 1], then [3, 'a', 2, 1], ... (using the example you provided in the question) –  ExpectoPatronum Apr 16 '13 at 7:48

First of all, you have a instead of s in recursive permut call.

return [ e + [l[0]] for e in permut(a, l[1:])] + [l+[s]]

First, it calculates permut(s, l[1:]), that is: tries to permute s and the part of the list without the first element. It throws the first element away as long there's any, then the recursive call returns [[s]].

Now, going backwards in calls, s is "added" to the every element of recursively created list, then given l is appended, and the results are:

# l == []
return [['a']]

# e == ['a']
# l == [3], l[0] == 3
return [['a'] + [3]] + [[3] + [a]]
# equals [['a', 3], [3, 'a']]

# e == ['a', 3] then [3, 'a']
# l == [2, 3], l[0] == 2
return [['a', 3] + [2], [3, 'a'] + [2]] + \
        [[2, 3] + [a]]
# equals [['a', 3, 2], [3, 'a', 2], [2, 3, 'a']]

# e == ['a', 3, 2] then [3, 'a', 2] then [2, 3, 'a']
# l == [1, 2, 3], l[0] == 1
return [['a', 3, 2] + [1], [3, 'a', 2] + [1], [2, 3, 'a'] + [1]] + \
        [[1, 2, 3] + ['a']]
# equals [['a', 3, 2, 1], [3, 'a', 2, 1], [2, 3, 'a', 1], [1, 2, 3, 'a']]

Maybe it's not beautiful to read, but it kind of works. You can see that e is extracted as single element of the list returned on the previous level.

You could also try:

def tee(parm):
    print parm
    return parm

And redefine permut as:

def permut(s,l):
    if l == []: return [[s]]
    return [ e + [l[0]] for e in tee(permut(s, l[1:]))] + [l+[s]]

My output:

[['a']]
[['a', 3], [3, 'a']]
[['a', 3, 2], [3, 'a', 2], [2, 3, 'a']]
[['a', 3, 2, 1], [3, 'a', 2, 1], [2, 3, 'a', 1], [1, 2, 3, 'a']]

Which covers recursive calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Why they go backward? –  T.C. Apr 16 '13 at 12:00
1  
To calculate permut('a', [1, 2, 3]) permut('a', [2, 3]) needs to be calculated first. In it, permut('a', [3]) is called, which calls permut('a', []). This way, permut('a', []) is the first call which has everything it needs to return a value, so it returns it to the higher level, which in turn is able to calculate the return value, too - and so it goes - forward in calls, backwards in returning results. It's possible to not go backwards with "tail recursion", though - I encourage you to explore this topic (though it's not much Python relevant). –  TNW Apr 16 '13 at 12:45

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