Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I don't understand an extra credit question on the problem below. I have already implemented try-catch statements and seem to work fine but our instructor now wants us to use a boolean variable in the loop condition instead of data !=0. I'm guessing:

while(data!=0.0)

But how would that work? Do I just get rid of it entirely and just use the boolean I already created? Any help is greatly appreciated. ps: I realize this may be super simple and I'm just not seeing it.

import java.util.*;

public class SumInput {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        double data = 1.0;
        double sum = 0.0;
        boolean valid = false;
        while (!valid) {
            try {
                while (data != 0.0) {
                System.out.print("So far, sum = " + sum
                    + "\nEnter a number or 0 to exit: ");
                data = input.nextDouble();
                sum = sum + data;
                valid = true;
                }
            } catch (InputMismatchException e) {
                System.out.println("Error--please enter a double number");
                input.next();
            } catch (NoSuchElementException e) {
                System.out.println("\nGoodbye!");
                System.exit(0);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Ending sum: " + sum);
    }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have updated your program to use the boolean instead of (data != 0.0) as your instructor expected. find the program below:

import java.util.*;

public class SumInput {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        double data = 1.0;
        double sum = 0.0;
        boolean valid = false;
        while (!valid) {
            try {
                while (true) {
                    System.out.print("So far, sum = " + sum
                            + "\nEnter a number or 0 to exit: ");
                    data = input.nextDouble();
                    sum = sum + data;
                    valid = true;
                    if (data == 0.0) {
                        break;
                    }
                }
            } catch (InputMismatchException e) {
                System.out.println("Error--please enter a double number");
                input.next();
            } catch (NoSuchElementException e) {
                System.out.println("\nGoodbye!");
                System.exit(0);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Ending sum: " + sum);
    }
}

Hope it solves your problem!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!! completely blanked on implementing an if statement with a break. Perfect, thanks again. –  user2268839 Apr 16 '13 at 8:38
    
@user2268839 welcome... –  Ganesh Apr 16 '13 at 8:41
    
This of course is a longer way of doing the same thing. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 16 '13 at 11:42

I imagine he wants

public class SumInput {
    public static void main(String... ignored) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        double sum = 0.0;
        while (true) {
            System.out.println("So far, sum = " + sum);
            System.out.print("Enter 'exit' to exit: ");
            if (!input.hasNextDouble())
                break;
            sum += input.nextDouble();
        }
        System.out.println("Ending sum: " + sum);
    }
}

runs like

So far, sum = 0.0
Enter 'exit' to exit: 122
So far, sum = 122.0
Enter 'exit' to exit: 232.2
So far, sum = 354.2
Enter 'exit' to exit: 322
So far, sum = 676.2
Enter 'exit' to exit: exit
Ending sum: 676.2

This is clearer and safer as you might want to sum values where 0.0 is not the last value.

Using this loop, you will be able to remove much of the code you have currently.

share|improve this answer
    
The 0 is used as stop passed by user. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Apr 16 '13 at 8:39
boolean valid = true;
while (valid) {
    if((data =input.nextDouble()) != 0.0)
        valid = true;
    else
       valid = false;

// perform your calculation.
}
share|improve this answer

Never ever use double in as logical (stop) condition, especially with == or !=.

The one problem in your code is data == 0.0 having this representation in double is quite difficult especially when you perform some calculation. This is cause by representation error

As you use 0, as stop condition i would remove that from the user output and left only Enter key as only way to exit the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
There's not generally anything wrong with using a double as an early-exit condition, if detected equality would imply that subsequent loop passes would perform the same computations as earlier ones, and if "falsely" detected inequality would never have any adverse effect beyond requiring the computer to do a somewhat-tolerable amount of additional work that might have been avoided. –  supercat Nov 22 '13 at 20:16
    
If you ware right then this example would not be an issue. ideone.com/lKzt2z –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Nov 25 '13 at 12:03
    
It looks to me as though that example is using double equality as a sole exit condition, rather than an early-exit condition. A better scenario would be something like double compute(double init, double param, int reps) {do {double prev = init; init = f(init, param); if (next == init) break; } while(--reps > 0); return init;}. If f() has no side-effects and doesn't care about the distinction between +0.0 and -0.0, then if its output and input match once, repeated calls will just yield the same result and may as well be skipped. Depending upon the nature of f(), it may be... –  supercat Nov 25 '13 at 17:16
    
...worthwhile to exit when the change in init falls below some threshold, but such an approach adds both development cost (figuring out what the threshold should be) and per-iteration run-time costs. If f() will stabilize quickly perfectly in 99.9% of those cases where early-exit would be appropriate, and the iteration count isn't excessive, tolerating some extra loop iterations in those cases where it quickly converges to a near-perfect result but doesn't quite reach perfection may be the best course of action. –  supercat Nov 25 '13 at 17:27
    
I should add as one more observation that in some kinds of a simulation, early-exiting based on a tolerance may alter the behavior of the simulation. One might view the difference between equality-based early-exit and tolerance-based as being like that between lossless audio compression and lossy compression. Even in cases where one can't tolerate any change in the recorded data, one may try to use lossless compression and it will often be somewhat helpful. It generally won't reduce things as much as lossy compression could, but is safe even in cases where lossy compression wouldn't be. –  supercat Nov 25 '13 at 17:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.