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I have two functions that I want to run on different threads (because they're database stuff, and they're not needed immediately).

The functions are:

            getTenantReciept_UnitTableAdapter1.Fill(rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_Unit);
            getTenantReciept_TenantNameTableAdapter1.Fill(rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_TenantName);

In javascript, I know I can create create an anonymous function and call it on a new thread quite easily with something like this:

setTimeout(new function(){doSomethingImportantInBackground();}, 500);

Is there something like this in C#?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Your question isn't very clear, I'm afraid. You can easily start a new thread with some code, using anonymous methods in C# 2, and lambda expressions in C# 3:

Anonymous method:

new Thread(delegate() {
    getTenantReciept_UnitTableAdapter1.Fill(
        rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_Unit);
}).Start();
new Thread(delegate() {
    getTenantReciept_TenantNameTableAdapter1.Fill(
        rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_TenantName);
}).Start();

Lambda expression:

new Thread(() =>
    getTenantReciept_UnitTableAdapter1.Fill(
        rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_Unit)
).Start();
new Thread(() =>
    getTenantReciept_TenantNameTableAdapter1.Fill(
        rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_TenantName)
).Start();

You can use the same sort of syntax for Control.Invoke, but it's slightly trickier as that can take any delegate - so you need to tell the compiler which type you're using rather than rely on an implicit conversion. It's probably easiest to write:

EventHandler eh = delegate
{
    // Code
};
control.Invoke(eh);

or

EventHandler eh = (sender, args) =>
{
    // Code
};
control.Invoke(eh);

As a side note, are your names really that long? Can you shorten them to get more readable code?

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I think the OP wanted each call to Fill() to run on its own thread. But other than that, spot on. –  LBushkin Oct 21 '09 at 20:10
    
@LBushkin: Will adjust. It's not a very clear question, to be honest. –  Jon Skeet Oct 21 '09 at 20:13
    
I was going to expand my answer to include lambda's but yours is more complete (and better) anyway. A backgroundworker component is still an option, as you don't have to worry about Control.Invoke. –  RichardOD Oct 21 '09 at 20:14
    
Okay, nevermaind, I don't have to execute it with Control.invoke. I thought it was earlier throwing an CrossThreadExecution thing-a-majigger –  Malfist Oct 21 '09 at 20:14
    
+1 for the comment on the long variable names with little to no actual meaning –  snicker Oct 21 '09 at 20:15

You could use an anonymous method:


void Foo()
{
    Thread myThread = new System.Threading.Thread(delegate(){
              //Your code here
     });
    myThread.Start();
}
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It gives error Cross-thread operation not valid: Control accessed from a thread other than the thread it was created on. –  Prakash Vishwakarma Aug 5 at 7:18

Similar to what's been said - I find tasks to be a bit simpler (supported as of .net 4):

Task mytask = Task.Run(() => 
{
    //Lines of code
});
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Starting threads is relatively expensive.

You might be better of using a thread from the thread pool:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(unused =>
    getTenantReciept_UnitTableAdapter1.Fill(
        rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_Unit)
);
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(unused =>
    getTenantReciept_TenantNameTableAdapter1.Fill(
        rentalEaseDataSet1.GetTenantReciept_TenantName)
);
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