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I am attempting to run a new SQL command for each value in my List. I have the below, whic just repeats the same value again and again for the amount in my list.

Please note that I have to loop the SQL through the amount of values in my array list, and insert each value as the name in the SQL as shown below.

What is the best way to do this as this definately isn't.

    int listSize = al.size();

    for(int i = 0; i < listSize; i++) {         
        ResultSet rs1 = name.executeQuery("SELECT sum(hours) FROM PROJECT_TIME WHERE DATE = '"+date+"' AND name = '"+al.listIterator().next()+"'");
        al1.add(rs1.getString(1));
        rs1.close();

    }
    System.out.println(al1);

Result:

[70, 70, 70, 70, 70, 70, 70, 70, 70, 70]

Expected Result:

[70, 80, 110, 60, 35, 10, 15, 10, 0, 25]

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Can you try the clause as name in (print the list) ? –  The New Idiot Apr 16 '13 at 8:59
3  
al.listIterator().next() will always be the same element. You need to get the iterator outside the loop then use it's methods to traverse the set. –  Andrew Thompson Apr 16 '13 at 8:59
    
@NoobUnChained Sorry, can you please explain what you mean? –  Rhys Apr 16 '13 at 9:01
    
It will always give you a new instance of iterator and the first element pointed by the iterator i.e. always the first element ? –  The New Idiot Apr 16 '13 at 9:01
2  
As an aside, isn't that code at risk of SQL injection attacks? I hear DB folks referring to a PreparedStatement to avoid such things. –  Andrew Thompson Apr 16 '13 at 9:02
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Problem is in

al.listIterator().next()

which returns the same value all the time. Hence the query returns the same result set string, that is why your result is 70 all the time.

try this code instead:

int listSize = al.size();

for(int i = 0; i < listSize; i++) {         
    ResultSet rs1 = name.executeQuery("SELECT sum(hours) FROM PROJECT_TIME WHERE DATE = '"+date+"' AND name = '"+al.get(i)+"'");
    while(rs1.next()){
        al1.add(rs1.getString(1));
    }
    rs1.close();

}
System.out.println(al1);
share|improve this answer
    
Bloody Brilliant. Just what I was after. You really are the 'Code Man' :) –  Rhys Apr 16 '13 at 9:12
    
@Rhys Thanks man.. :) –  codeMan Apr 16 '13 at 9:14
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Every time you are creating new Itrator which return same value every time. Try below code

int listSize = al.size();

    for(int i = 0; i < listSize; i++) {         
        ResultSet rs1 = name.executeQuery("SELECT sum(hours) FROM PROJECT_TIME WHERE DATE = '"+date+"' AND name = '"+al.get(i)+"'");
        al1.add(rs1.getString(1));
        rs1.close();

    }
    System.out.println(al1);
share|improve this answer
    
Right answer as well +1 for you and codeman –  user_CC Apr 16 '13 at 9:13
    
Gave you an up vote also for same answer. Cheers for your help. –  Rhys Apr 16 '13 at 9:16
    
@user_CC and Rhys thanks. –  Rais Alam Apr 16 '13 at 9:21
    
@RaisAlam good answer !!! –  Piyush Bhardwaj May 27 '13 at 5:29
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Please use

while(rs1.next()){
  System.out.println(rs1.getString(1));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but that won't work. As you can See I am using an iterator in the SQL which needs to repeat for the number in listSize, which controls my loop. –  Rhys Apr 16 '13 at 8:57
    
ok wot doest you list contain? string|int –  Amit Sharma Apr 16 '13 at 8:59
    
List contains names, values that will changes often, hence the loop, otherwise I would just have a simple SQL statement. with a while loop. –  Rhys Apr 16 '13 at 9:05
    
Yes please refer my latest post.... –  Amit Sharma Apr 16 '13 at 9:08
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Setup the for loop like this to use every entry in the list:

    for(String name : al) {         
        ResultSet rs1 = name.executeQuery("SELECT sum(hours) FROM PROJECT_TIME WHERE DATE = '"+date+"' AND name = '"+name+"'");
        al1.add(rs1.getString(1));
        rs1.close();

    }
    System.out.println(al1);
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add comment

you can replace the for loop with while

Interator i = al.listIterator(); 
while(i.hasNext()){ 
    String name = i.next(); 
    ResultSet rs1 = name.executeQuery("SELECT sum(hours) FROM PROJECT_TIME WHERE DATE ="+date+"' AND name = '"+name+"'"); 
    while(rs1.next()){ 
      System.out.println(rs1.getString(1)); 
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't you already suggest this above? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 16 '13 at 9:29
    
no i ddn't...earlier post was something different...here i was trying to resolve the iterator issue. –  Amit Sharma Apr 16 '13 at 9:46
    
It looks just the same to me. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 16 '13 at 10:44
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The simple answer is you need do al.get(i) and call rs1.next() before reading from the result set. You should also be checking that the call rs1.next() returns true before trying to read from the result set.

But this overlooks the fact that executing a query in a loop sucks - the performance will be terrible and you're hammering the database. Each time you call name.executeQuery a remote call is being made with all the overheads that entails and you're doing that for each item in the collection you're iterating over. If there's 1000 items in the collection, that's 1000 remote calls. Also, using string concatenation to build the query means the database has to calculate the query plan each time the query is executed.

To do this properly you should perform a single query using a prepared statement and then iterate over the result set - 1 remote call - something like:

PreparedStatement preparedStatement = null;
ResultSet resultSet = null;

try
{
  preparedStatement = connection.prepareStatement("SELECT sum(hours) FROM project_time WHERE date = ? AND name IN ?");

  preparedStatement.setDate(1, date);
  preparedStatement.setArray(2, connection.createArrayOf("VARCHAR", al.toArray());

  resultSet = preparedStatement.executeQuery();

  List<String> hours = new ArrayList<String>();

  while (resultSet.next()) 
  {
    hours.add(resultSet.getString(1));
  }

  System.out.println(hours);
}
finally
{
  if (resultSet != null) resultSet.close();
  if (preparedStatement != null) preparedStatement.close();
}

Without knowing what database you're using it's hard to know if the syntax is 100% but you should get the gist.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. I definately agree I should be using prepearedStatements to reduce load and for security and I will be changing my code to suit. –  Rhys Apr 17 '13 at 19:49
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When you use iterator for List, it gives you the very first element location in list, and when Iterator.next() is called, Iterator moves to nest element location.

`int listSize = al.size();

for(int i = 0; i < listSize; i++) {         
    ResultSet rs1 = name.executeQuery("SELECT sum(hours) FROM PROJECT_TIME WHERE DATE = '"+date+"' AND name = '"+al.get(i)+"'");
    al1.add(rs1.getString(1));
    rs1.close();

}
System.out.println(al1);`
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