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Recently I came across this question write a function to swap two numbers without using extra space? The function can be in two ways:

int swap ( int *a, int* b)
{
    *a = *a+*b;
    *b = *a-*b;
    *a = *a-*b;
}

The other way is XOR operation:

int swap ( int *a, int* b)
{
    *a = *a^*b;
    *b = *a^*b;
    *a = *a^*b;
}

Even though both these functions are a good idea, they will not work if both of a and b point to a single memory location? How to tackle this?

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marked as duplicate by Lightness Races in Orbit, Lundin, Luca Geretti, hyde, default locale Apr 16 '13 at 11:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7  
if (a != b)?? –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 16 '13 at 9:38
3  
Well if both pointers point to the same place, there's nothing to swap is there? A simple check should be enough for that. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 16 '13 at 9:39
3  
-1 for "Even though both these functions are a good idea". They are both terrible ideas. This is a perfect example of premature optimization. Use a temp variable, it will most likely be more efficient. And it doesn't make any sense to return a value. –  Lundin Apr 16 '13 at 9:44
5  
@luk32 There is no situation in the real world where it makes sense to use XOR swaps. If you can't store one int in memory for a plain swap function, then you should inline the function to begin with. The historical reasons for XOR swaps is that on systems with extremely small RAM, you'd use a register instead. But such optimizations does not even make sense on any of the most low-end 8-bitters today. It's an obsolete algorithm. –  Lundin Apr 16 '13 at 9:53
2  
@Ludin OP never said he uses it as an actual optimization in a production code. Of course it is not meant for a memory optimization. Maybe it is for better asm, or squeeze more instructions per cycle. Also would you down-vote all theoretical questions 'cause they are non-real world ? Actually nvm. It's relevant to question. I think you should differentiate between constraints and optimizations, though. –  luk32 Apr 16 '13 at 10:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is obvious in math.

int swap ( int *a, int* b)
{
    *a = *a+*b;
    *b = *a-*b;
    *a = *a-*b;
}

when a and b point to same place then, above code turns into

*a = *a + *a; // *a = 2 x (*a)
*b = *a - *a; // = 0
*a = *a - *a; // = 0

So, Both *a and *b are zero. Therefor you should handle it with an if:

int swap ( int *a, int* b)
{
    if (a!=b)
    {
      *a = *a+*b;
      *b = *a-*b;
      *a = *a-*b;
    }
}

And same for xor version.

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swap without using third variable in c language allitstuff.com/swap-without-using-third-variable-in-c-language –  jd namera Aug 21 '13 at 9:09
#define SWAP(a, b) (((a) == (b)) || (((a) ^= (b)), ((b) ^= (a)), ((a) ^= (b))))
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I hope those a and b aren't the original pointers. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 16 '13 at 9:52
    
Correct. I was being lazy. :-P –  Joe Apr 16 '13 at 9:59

Why would anyone swap two numbers without using extra space?

What sadist would give you enough space for two but not three?

Why do you call it 'space' anyway? It's just a third number, there's no need to allude to a vast, vacuum-filled place.

The algorithm using a temporary uses O(1) space in the number of swap operations. It's O(n) in the numbers' length, but quite possibly so are the bit-twiddling and arithmetic ones given a processor-unfriendly n.

If you don't have enough space for a simple number, you've simply run out of space. I can't see where you can go from a swap in that case.

Why not store the two numbers in their proper places in the first place?

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You can try this, a=a+b; b=a-b; a=a-b;

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Did you read the question –  Kranthi Kumar Apr 17 '13 at 1:51

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