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For developing a REST web service there are 5 basic use cases (as I see it)

/api/entities        - GET
/api/entities/{id}   - GET
/api/entities        - POST
/api/entities/{id}   - PUT
/api/entities/{id}   - DELETE

A DTO provides an optimal representation of the data needed to interact with a web service.

I like both of these concepts but where I am struggling is how to organise DTO's in relation to how they interact with a particular web service.

Should there only be one DTO per web service? Example:

EntityDto
    - Property1
    - Property2
    - Property3
    - Property4
    - Property5

Or should there be a DTO per use case? Example:

GetEntityDto 
   - Property1
   - Property2
   - Property3
   - Property4
   - Property5

AddEntityDto
   - Property2
   - Property3
   - Property4
   - Property5

EditEntityDto
   - Property4
   - Property5

The way I see it if you can only update 2 properties why send all 5?

What is the best way to deal with DTO's in relation to REST web services?

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a spot of topic I grant you, but don't forget there are other methods out there, such as PATCH, which is intended for partial modification. – thecoshman Aug 10 '15 at 14:10

I guess the question I would ask myself would be: do I want to optimize my API for network bandwidth and couple it to HTTP methods or do I would want to expose my API as a simple model to allow the consumers (current and future) greater latitude in how they implement their use of the API?

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I almost always develop DTO's as needed. It is easily done using .NET anonymous types and/or mapping utilities like AutoMapper. DTO are highly coupled with UI and you barely can optimize your development by pre designing them without knowing exactly what is your UI going to look like. The exception is the Delete in which you would inly need the ID.

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