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I've been using the following query for some time, but as the results database has grown, it has become slow to the point of being un usable. Could anyone suggest an alternative way of doing this?

I've got fulltext indices on c.name and r.scope

SELECT * FROM results r 
        INNER JOIN categories c on r.id = c.result_id 
        INNER JOIN tags t on r.id = t.result_id 
        WHERE c.name in ('purchase', 'single_family', 'other')

        AND ( r.scope = 'all' OR r.scope = 'hi' )
        AND published = 1
    GROUP BY r.id
        HAVING COUNT(c.c_id) >= 3
        ORDER BY r.usefulness DESC
        LIMIT 8 OFFSET 0

Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

Edit: Here's the result of EXPLAIN

  id    select_type     table   type    possible_keys   key     key_len     ref     rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  c   range   nameindex,name  nameindex   767     NULL    10036   Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE  t   ALL     NULL    NULL    NULL    NULL    10229   Using where; Using join buffer
1   SIMPLE  r   eq_ref  PRIMARY,scope   PRIMARY     4   rfw.t.result_id     1   Using where
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It is recommendable that you use indexes on field c.name to make it faster. –  fedorqui Apr 16 '13 at 9:48
3  
What does the EXPLAIN say? –  Vyktor Apr 16 '13 at 9:49
    
do you have index on categories.name? –  Artjom Kurapov Apr 16 '13 at 9:49
    
I don't think your query is slow because of the where clause, but because of the ORDER BY one. Anyway, show what EXPLAIN has to say about this if you want help. –  Twisted1919 Apr 16 '13 at 9:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Update: query to create index

CREATE INDEX name ON categories (name);


Use Explain statement, the output of explain will help you to decide which column require index & other useful information.

As specified in mysql doc:

When you precede a SELECT statement with the keyword EXPLAIN, MySQL displays information from the optimizer about the query execution plan. That is, MySQL explains how it would process the statement, including information about how tables are joined and in which order.

Run this:

    EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM results r 
    INNER JOIN categories c on r.id = c.result_id 
    INNER JOIN tags t on r.id = t.result_id 
    WHERE c.name in ('purchase', 'single_family', 'other')

    AND ( r.scope = 'all' OR r.scope = 'hi' )
    AND published = 1
GROUP BY r.id
    HAVING COUNT(c.c_id) >= 3
    ORDER BY r.usefulness DESC
    LIMIT 8 OFFSET 0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, see my edit above :) –  Martin Hunt Apr 16 '13 at 10:00
    
Can you create index on name column in categories table and run explain & query again. i have added the sample query that will create index. –  metalfight - user868766 Apr 16 '13 at 10:07
    
Just edited again, really appreciate the help :D –  Martin Hunt Apr 16 '13 at 10:12
    
create index on result_id column in tags table after that check execution time of query & output of explain –  metalfight - user868766 Apr 16 '13 at 10:37
    
Perfect. Thanks so much, it's super speedy now! –  Martin Hunt Apr 16 '13 at 10:43

You don't need a fulltext index here; a regular index is what mySQL will want to use for this field.

A fulltext index is intended for use with fulltext searching (ie the MATCH .. AGAINST query); it won't be relevant to a simple equals or IN () query.

share|improve this answer

When you want to make your query faster, you could do 3 things:

  • add index on c.name (slow query suggests that you're not having any)
  • add count to categories (with index on it), which would contain cached data
    WHERE c.count >= 3 will fetch only limited number of results
    HAVING COUNT() >= 3 has to fetch all results before returning
  • use WHERE c.id IN (...) instead of WHERE c.name in ('...) if possible...
    id = identification = PRIMARY KEY, this is what it was meant to do
share|improve this answer

1) Select only required for your answer columns. 2) Setup propertly tables indexes. Also you can get some info using EXPLAIN SELECT ...

share|improve this answer
    
-1 you basically said to him that he should debug it on his own using explain –  Vyktor Apr 16 '13 at 10:03

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