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Here is my query:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temptbl (
  pibn INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL, page SMALLINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL)
  ENGINE=MEMORY;
INSERT INTO temptbl (
  SELECT pibn,page FROM mytable
  WHERE word1=429907 AND word2=0);
ALTER TABLE temptbl ADD INDEX (pibn,page);
SELECT word1,COUNT(*) AS aaa
  FROM mytable a
  INNER JOIN temptbl b
  ON a.pibn=b.pibn AND a.page=b.page
  WHERE word2=0
  GROUP BY word1 ORDER BY aaa DESC LIMIT 10;
DROP TABLE temptbl;

The issue is the SELECT word1,COUNT(*) AS aaa, specifically the count. That select statement takes 16 seconds.

EXPLAIN says:

+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------------------------+-------------+---------+-------------------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys                   | key         | key_len | ref                                                         | rows  | Extra                           |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------------------------+-------------+---------+-------------------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | b     | ALL  | pibn                            | NULL        | NULL    | NULL                                                        | 26778 | Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | a     | ref  | w2pibnpage1,word21pibn,pibnpage | w2pibnpage1 | 9       | const,db.b.pibn,db.b.page                                   |     4 | Using index                     |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------------------------+-------------+---------+-------------------------------------------------------------+-------+---------------------------------+

The index used (w2pibnpage1) is on:

word2,pibn,page,word1,id

I've been struggling with this for days, trying different combinations of columns for the index (which is annoying as it takes an hour to rebuild - millions of rows).

What should my indexes be, or what should I do to get this query to run in a fraction of a second (as it should)?

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How many rows do the tables contain (approximately)? –  Jocelyn Apr 16 '13 at 10:57
    
Currently 150 million. But that will be in the billions soon enough. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 10:58
    
For your tests, I suggest creating empty copies of your 2 tables. Change the indexes on these empty tables. Rewrite your query with the names of the copied tables. You can run EXPLAIN using this modified query. Since the tables are empty, changing the indexes or running EXPLAIN will be very fast. –  Jocelyn Apr 16 '13 at 11:01
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5 Answers 5

Here is a suggestion.

Presumably the temporary table is small. You can remove the index on that table, because a full table scan is fine there. In fact, that is what you want.

You then want indexes used on the big table. First the indexes need to match the join condition, then to match the where condition, and finally the group by condition. So, the suggestion is:

mytable(pibn, page, word2, word1, aaa)

I'm throwing in the order by column, so it doesn't have to fetch the value from the original data.

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OK. But actually I'd prefer my statement to exclude based on the where condition first. Is that not what my query does? –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 11:10
    
Also the temporary table is likely to contain 10,000 or so. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 11:11
    
Also aaa isn't a real column, it's just the label of the COUNT, and this is what is causing the problem. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 11:12
    
The explain plan shows that it is curerntly doing a full table scan? –  symcbean Apr 16 '13 at 11:28
    
I tried your index suggestion, but it didn't make any speed difference. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 12:08
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The query is taking a long time, but the expensive part seems to be accessing 'mytable' (you've not provided the structure of this) however the optimizer seems to think it only needs to fetch 4 rows from this using an index - which should be very fast. i.e. the data appears to be very skewed - how many rows does the last query examine (tally of counts)?

Without having a lok at the exact distribution of data, it's hard to be definitive - certainly you may need to hint the query to get it to work efficiently. The problem with designing indexes is that they should make all the queries faster - or at least give a reasonable tradeoff.

Looking at the predicates in the queries you've provided...

WHERE word1=429907 AND word2=0

Would be best served by an index on word1,word2,.... or word2,word1,.....

ON a.pibn=b.pibn AND a.page=b.page
WHERE a.word2=0

Would be best served by an index on mytable with word2+pibn+page in the leading columns.

How many distinct values are there for mytable.word1 and for mytable.word2? If word2 has a low number of distinct values (less than 20 or so) then it's not adding much selectivity to the index and can be omitted.

An index on word2,pibn,page,word1 gives you a covering index for the second query.

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There are 600,000 distinct values for word1 and word2. There are hundreds of million of rows. There are hundreds of thousands of distinct values for pibn. The first select to fill the temporary table will take 10,000 rows on average, possibly up to 100,000. I've tracked the slowdown to the COUNT(*). –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 11:32
    
Do you mean 600,000 values for word1+word2 or 600,000 values for word1 and 600,000 values for word2? If it's the latter then your indexes need rebuilding. –  symcbean Apr 16 '13 at 12:42
    
The latter. 600,000 each. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 12:54
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If your temptbl is small you want to first restrict the bigger table (mytable) and then join it (eventually by index) to your temptbl.

Right now, MySQL thinks it is better off by using the index of the bigger table to join.

You can get around this by doing a straight join:

  SELECT word1,COUNT(*) AS aaa
    FROM mytable a
    STRAIGHT_JOIN temptbl b
      ON a.pibn=b.pibn AND a.page=b.page
  WHERE word2=0
  GROUP BY word1 
  ORDER BY aaa DESC LIMIT 10;

This should use your index in mytable for the where clause and join mytable to temptbl via the index in temptbl.

If MySQL still wants to do it different, you can use FORCE INDEX to make it use the index.

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I tried your query. It took 1 and a half minutes for the same result, so it's less efficient. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 12:08
    
Can you please run an explain on my query? That might show the problem. –  drunken_monkey Apr 16 '13 at 12:42
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With your data volumes is is not going to work fast no matter what you do, not without changing the schema.

If I understand you right, you're looking for the top words which go along with 429907 on the same pages.

You model as it it now would require counting all those words over an over again each time you run the query.

To speed it up, you would need to create an additional stats table:

CREATE TABLE word_pairs
        (
        word1_1 INT NOT NULL,
        word1_2 INT NOT NULL,
        cnt BIGINT NOT NULL,
        PRIMARY KEY (word1_1, word1_2),
        INDEX (word1_1, cnt),
        INDEX (word1_2, cnt)
        )

and update it each time you're inserting a record into a large table (increase the cnt for the newly inserted word and all the words it's being on the same page with).

This would probably bee too slow for a single server as such updates would require some time, so you would also need to shard that table across multiple servers.

If you had such a table you could just run:

SELECT  *
FROM    word_pairs
WHERE   word1_1 = 429907
ORDER BY
        cnt DESC
LIMIT   10

which would be instant.

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Yes, I understand. Actually the results from this query will be put into another the word_pairs (words often associated with this word) table. I do think it's possible to optimize the query to be fast though, I've done it for other queries on this giant table and have managed to get them super-fast. Only this one I'm still struggling with but it has to be possible! –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 11:54
    
@Alasdair: it involves counts which are not indexable in MySQL. Good luck with that and please let me know if you succeed! :) –  Quassnoi Apr 16 '13 at 11:57
    
@Alasdair: BTW when the query completes, what are the top counts it returns? –  Quassnoi Apr 16 '13 at 11:57
    
429907 26778, 657171 15886, 657271 14193, 657272 11459, etc. Some duplicates it seems, that must mean the group is not working. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 12:00
    
My mistake... no duplicates, the numbers were just coincidentally very close together. Probably variants on the same word, or spelling. –  Alasdair Apr 16 '13 at 12:13
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I came up with this:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp1 (
  pibn INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL, page SMALLINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL)
  ENGINE=MEMORY;
INSERT INTO temp1 (
  SELECT pibn,page FROM mytable
  WHERE word1=429907 AND word2=0);
CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp2 (
  word1 MEDIUMINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL)
  ENGINE=MEMORY;
INSERT INTO temp2 (
SELECT a.word1
  FROM mytable a, temp1 b
  WHERE a.word2=0 AND a.pibn=b.pibn AND a.page=b.page);
DROP TABLE temp1;
CREATE INDEX index1 ON temp2 (word1) USING BTREE;
CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp3 (
  word1 MEDIUMINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL, num INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL)
  ENGINE=MEMORY;
INSERT INTO temp3 (SELECT word1,COUNT(*) AS aaa FROM temp2 USE INDEX (index1) GROUP BY word1);
DROP TABLE temp2;
CREATE INDEX index1 ON temp3 (num) USING BTREE;
SELECT word1,num FROM temp3 USE INDEX (index1) ORDER BY num DESC LIMIT 10;
DROP TABLE temp3;

Takes 5 seconds.

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