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In the Symfony coding standards it says: >

Use camelCase, not underscores, for variable, function and method names, arguments;

Use underscores for option names and parameter names;

In this context, what is the difference between parameters and arguments?

I think I understand the option names part (i.e. when you have an $options array, like in the code example on that page) but what qualifies as a 'parameter'?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think that when array values are used as options (have the meaning of), in general.

For example in forms:

public function getDefaultOptions(array $options)
{
    return array(
        'validation_groups' => array('registration')
    );
}

In your bundle configuration:

class Configuration implements ConfigurationInterface
{
    public function getConfigTreeBuilder()
    {
        $treeBuilder = new TreeBuilder();
        $rootNode = $treeBuilder->root('acme_hello');

        $rootNode
            ->children()
            ->scalarNode('my_type')->defaultValue('bar')->end()
            ->end();

        return $treeBuilder;
    }
}

In container parameters:

# app/config/config.yml
parameters:
    my_mailer.class:      Acme\HelloBundle\Mailer
    my_mailer.transport:  sendmail

services:
    my_mailer:
        class:        "%my_mailer.class%"
        arguments:    ["%my_mailer.transport%"]
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Ah... so the config.yml (or other .yml file) settings are parameters. Thank you! –  caponica Apr 16 '13 at 12:21
    
@caponica yes, basically config.yml files are used for bundle configuration (assetic, security and even your own). Usually you define parameters (along with their values) in parameters.yml and use that parameters with the %...% notation in your config files. –  gremo Apr 16 '13 at 13:38

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