Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How do I organize many projects on Team Foundation Services (TFS in the cloud).

I have about 300 solutions (with multiple projects in each solution) that I want to source control in TFS. The problem is how do I organize them?

A little background: I am an contract developer so I work for many clients and have many projects written in VB and C# ranging from VB6 to .net 4.5 and everything in between.

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think the key is to understand the organisational structure on offer to you with Team Foundation Service. How you choose to organise it is ultimately up to you.

You have the following available to you in Team Foundation Service.

  1. One Project Collection
    • In normal TFS you can have many Project Collections. In Team Foundation Service (at the time of writing), you can only have 1.
  2. Team Projects
    • These are the projects that go into the Project colection.
    • You can put many solutions into one Team Project or you can simply have one.
  3. Source Control Folders
    • Each project obviously contains Source Control folders, so these could be further split up into projects.

I don't have as many projects as you, but I do something like this:

  1. Create dedicated Team Projects for major projects (solutions)
  2. Put similar minor projects (solutions) into one Team Project
  3. You can even nest things further. I have included a real world scenario I use for the SSRS report we write.

See below for an example how I do it:

  • Collection (Project Collection)
    • Major Project 1 (Team Project)
      • trunk
      • branches
        • branch 1
    • Group Of Minor Projects (Team Project)
      • Minor Project 1
        • trunk
        • branches
      • Minor Project 2
        • trunk
        • branches
      • Minor Project 3
        • trunk
        • branches
    • Major Project 2 (Team Project)
      • trunk
      • branches
        • branch 1
    • Group of SSRS Projects (Team Project)
      • 2005
        • Clients
          • Client1
            • trunk (Optional)
            • branches (Optional)
          • Client2
          • Client3 Shared (All Clients)
      • 2008
        • Clients
          • Client1
          • Client2
          • Client3 Shared (All Clients)
      • 2008 R2
        • Clients
          • Client1
          • Client2
          • Client3 Shared (All Clients)

One point to remember is that builds are separated by Team Project. So this might impact your decision further.

share|improve this answer
    
Good explanation as to what my choices are. Can I create folders under a folder? So in my case I would probably create a folder by customer and then a folder for the IDE used to create it (VB6, VS2003,VS2005 ...VS2012) and a folder for the solution and then add the projects to that? – GaryH Apr 17 '13 at 2:46
    
Yes - that's one of the use cases I have. I will edit the post above to include it. – gregpakes Apr 17 '13 at 7:10
    
So how where I store a common utilities project that is shared by other projects? – GaryH Apr 17 '13 at 11:40
    
Personally, I like to keep them separate and use a private NuGet repository to store the compiled versions. If you are not keen on this then you can do cross folder and team project references. At the end of the day it's just files on your drive. It gets more complex if you want to start using Team Build. if so, then you will want to have the shared project in the same Team Project so the build server can access it. but IMO, the NuGet route is much better! – gregpakes Apr 17 '13 at 11:47
    
Great idea. In about 90 minutes, I was able to do my own repository. If anyone else is interested, it is a 2 step process (with step #1 being optional): 1) Setup my own Nuget server ... link 2) Created some Nuget packages that included just the common DLLS that I use on a lot of projects and then uploaded them to my nuget server ... link (you can go command line but I just found the GUI much easier to create AND deploy) – GaryH Apr 18 '13 at 1:50

Since you are creating different projects for different clients I’d organize your solutions by client.

I’d have a total of one project collection and one team project per client. Then inside each team project you can structure the solutions any way you like.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.