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I have a web application where I load (via ajax) a dictionary file (1MB) into the javascript array. I found the reason why the Mobile Safari crashes after 10 seconds. But now what I'm wondering is how do I get around this issue?

On the link above the answer suggest using setInterval, but this would mean I would have to have a dictionary file chunked into pieces and have them loaded one by one. This surely could be done, but I would have to make a lot of chunks taking into account the internet speed and too many requests would take forever for the page to load (and if I make the chunks too big it could happen that some mobile users wouldn't be able to download the chunk in a given 10second period).

So, my question is: has anyone encountered this kind of problem and how did you go about it? A general push in the right direction is appreciated.

edit: This is the js code which I use to load the dictionary:

var dict = new Trie();

$.ajax({
    url: 'data/dictionary_342k_uppercase.txt',
    async: true,
    success: function (data) {
        var words = data.split('\n');
        for (var i = words.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            dict.insert(words[i]);
        }           
    },
    error: function(){
        $('#loading-message').text("Problem s rječnikom");
    }
});

Trie.js:

function Trie () {
  var ALPHABET_SIZE = 30;
  var ASCII_OFFSET = 'A'.charCodeAt();

  this.children = null;
  this.isEndOfWord = false;

  this.contains = function (str) {
    var curNode = this;

    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
      var idx = str.charCodeAt(i) - ASCII_OFFSET;
      if (curNode.children && curNode.children[idx]) {
        curNode = curNode.children[idx];
      } else {
        return false;
      }
    }

    return curNode.isEndOfWord;
  }

  this.has = function (ch) {
    if (this.children) {
      return this.children[ch.charCodeAt() - ASCII_OFFSET] != undefined;
    }
    return false;
  }

  this.next = function (ch) {
    if (this.children) {
      return this.children[ch.charCodeAt() - ASCII_OFFSET];
    }
    return undefined;
  }

  this.insert = function (str) {
    var curNode = this;

    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
      var idx = str.charCodeAt(i) - ASCII_OFFSET;

      if (curNode.children == null) {
        curNode.children = new Array(ALPHABET_SIZE);
        curNode = curNode.children[idx] = new Trie();
      } else if (curNode.children[idx]) {
        curNode = curNode.children[idx];
      } else {
        curNode = curNode.children[idx] = new Trie();
      }
    }

    curNode.isEndOfWord = true;
    return curNode;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
The 10 second rule does not include time spent waiting for HTTP responses. What exactly goes on in the code that handles the response from your server? What exactly are you doing with the dictionary contents? –  Pointy Apr 21 '13 at 14:47
    
@Pointy: I'm loading the dictionary into trie "structure". Take a look at my edit. –  Nikola Apr 21 '13 at 17:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

This is a very common issue once you start doing processing in JS. If the Mobile Safari issue is the cause then what you want to do is figure out where the CPU time is going here.

I'm assuming it's the dict.insert() loop and not the data.split() call (that would be a bit more difficult to manage).

The idea here is to split up the dict.insert() loop into functional blocks that can be called asynchronously in a sequenced loop (which is what the setupBuildActions function does). After the first block each subsequent block is called via setTimeout, which effectively resets the function-time counter in the JS runtime (which seems to be what's killing your process).

Using the Sequencer function means you also keep control of the order in which the functions are run (they always run in the sequence they are generated in here and no two or more functions are scheduled for execution at the same time). This is much more effective than firing off thousands of setTimeout calls without callbacks. Your code retains control over the order of execution (which also means you can make changes during execution) and the JS runtime isn't overloaded with scheduled execution requests.

You might also want to check the node project at https://github.com/michiel/sequencer-js for more sequencing examples and http://ejohn.org/blog/how-javascript-timers-work/ for an explanation on setTimeout on different platforms.

var dict = new Trie();

// These vars are accessible from all the other functions we're setting up and
// running here

var BLOCKSIZE     = 500;
var words         = [];
var buildActions  = [];

function Sequencer(funcs) {
  (function() {
    if (funcs.length !== 0) {
      funcs.shift()(arguments.callee);
    }
  })();
}

// Build an Array with functions that can be called async (using setTimeout)

function setupBuildActions() {
  for (var offset=0; offset<words.length; offset+= BLOCKSIZE) {
    buildActions.push((function(offset) {
      return function(callback) {
        for (var i=offset; i < offset + BLOCKSIZE ; i++) {
          if (words[i] !== null) { // ugly check for code brevity
            dict.insert(words[i]);
          }
        }           
        // This releases control before running the next dict.insert loop
        setTimeout(callback, 0);
      };
    })(offset));
  }
}

$.ajax({
    url: 'data/dictionary_342k_uppercase.txt',
    async: true,
    success: function (data) {
      // You might want to split and setup these calls 
      // in a setTimeout if the problem persists and you need to narrow it down
      words = data.split('\n');
      setupBuildActions();
      new Sequencer(buildActions);
    },
    error: function(){
      $('#loading-message').text("Problem s rječnikom");
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Here's an example using setTimeout to defer the actual insertion of words into your trie. It breaks up the original string into batches, and uses setTimeout to defer processing of inserting each batch of words. The batch size in my example is 5 words.

The actual batch insertion happens as subsequent event handlers in the browser.

It's possible that just breaking the words up into batches might take too long. If you hit this problem, remember you can chain setTimeout() calls, eg iterating for a while then using setTimeout to schedule another event to iterate over some more, then setTimeout again, etc.

    function addBatch(batch)
    {
            console.log("Processing batch:");
            for (var i = 0; i < batch.length; i++)
                    console.log(batch[i]);
            console.log("Return from processing batch");
    }

    var str = "alpha\nbravo\ncharlie\ndelta\necho\nfoxtrot\n" + 
              "golf\nhotel\nindia\njuliet\nkilo\nlima\n" + 
              "mike\nnovember\noscar\npapa\nquebec\n" + 
              "romeo\nsierra\ntango\nuniform\n" + 
              "victor\nwhiskey\nxray\nyankee\nzulu";

    var batch = []
    var wordend;
    for (var wordstart = 0; wordstart < str.length; wordstart = wordend+1)
    {
            wordend = str.indexOf("\n", wordstart);
            if (wordend < 0)
                    wordend = str.length;
            var word = str.substring(wordstart, wordend);
            batch.push(word);

            if (batch.length > 5)
            {
                    setTimeout(addBatch, 0, batch);
                    batch = [ ];
            }
    }
    setTimeout(addBatch, 0, batch);
    batch = [ ];
share|improve this answer

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