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I have a game that creates 'bots' which wander around a map aimlessly. Every time the player clicks a button, a new Thread is created which creates the bot. If you press the button numerous times, numerous bots are made all with the same Thread name botThread.

However I want to be able to differentiate between the bots so I can stop individual bots. So I have used the setName() function to change the name of the first bot to "Bot 1", but if I try Bot1.stop(), it says the Thread doesn't exist? (I know I shouldn't use .stop() method).

However, if I get an error in the Thread it says " Exception in thread "Bot 1"". So it clearly does exist!

Here is some of my code:

public class botGame{

Thread botThread;

public void newBot(){

botThread = new Thread(new Runnable(){

      public void run(){

             botThread.setName("Bot 1");
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A better alternative to my other answer would be to have the bots keep track of their own threads:

class Bot {
    Thread thread = null;
    private String name;
    volatile boolean stop = false;
    Bot(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
    public void run() {
        thread = new Thread(new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                while(!stop) {
                    ...
                }
            }
        };
        thread.start();
    }
    public void stop() {
        stop = true;
    }
}

And in you bot-creating code do this:

public class botGame{
    Map<String, Bot> bots = new Map<String, Bot>();

    public void makeNewBot(String name) {
        bots.put(name, new(Bot(name)));
    }

    public void startBot(String name) {
        bots.get(name).run();  // TODO: Add check for wrong name
    }

    public void stopBot(String name) {
        bots.get(name).stop(); // TODO: Add check for wrong name
    }
}
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The thread name is simply a useful identifier for debugging your code. It is completely unrelated to any variables, objects or identifiers in your applications.

In other words: Calling thread.setName("foo") does not magically allow you to call foo.stop().

What you want to do instead is hold the Thread objects you created in some collection or map, retrieve it from there and manipulate it then (ideally not using stop(), as you noted).

For example, instead of a single botThread field, you'd have this:

Collection<Thread> botThreads = new ArrayList<Thread>();

and when you start a thread you do this:

Thread botThread = new Thread( ... );
botThread.start();
botThreads.add(botThread);

And since we're on the topic of avoiding stop: If you don't hold on to the Thread object, but to a BotRunnable instead, you can add a pleaseStop method to that BotRunnable that sets a volatile boolean field named keepRunning (or similar) to false. Then, inside the run method, periodically check that field and if it's false, simply return.

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try to put your thread in a list, so you can go on the element you want, and delete it

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How would I do that? –  T.S Apr 16 '13 at 12:18
    
Better to use a map... –  shan Apr 16 '13 at 12:18
    
any container with a variable size, in fact –  wazaminator Apr 16 '13 at 12:20
    
inside your button click method, you can put the thread with it's name into a map –  shan Apr 16 '13 at 12:20
    
@shan: "better" depends a lot on how he needs to access them. If he just needs to get "all of them" or "any one", then a collection is just fine. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 16 '13 at 12:20

You should do something like this:

public class botGame{
  Map<String, Thread> botThreads = new Map<String, Thread>();
  public void newBot(){
  Thread botThread = new Thread(new Runnable(){
    public void run(){
      }
    };
  botThreads.put("Bot 1", botThread);
}

I have not checked my example closely for errors and also you need a way of creating threads with different names, but I think you can get the idea of the map.

To find a thread object, do Thread thread = botThreads.get("Bot 1");

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Instead of using the thread name, you could monitor a Statefull class or a Map that would give the thread permission to run or not.

So once the permission to run is lost, your thread just ends by itself.

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The method Thread.stop() should not be used. It is deprecated for a reason - deprecation reason. Use volatile booleanflag in the thread to check whether it should stop or not. Set the flag in the main thread when you want to stop it.

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