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I was recently reading Patterson and Hennessy's book "Computer Organization and Design" in order to study a bit of assembly. I came across a section where the lw and sw machine instructions were explained and how they take a 16-bit immediate as the load/store address. What the authors pointed here is this: "The 16-bit address means a load word instruction can load any word within a region of [...] 8192 words of the address in the base register rs".

My question is:

  • Does that mean that all registers' addresses are spaced 8192 words apart from each other?
  • Also, does it mean that the whole available memory for operating is 32 * 8192 = 262144 words?
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you take the address register used in the instruction, add the immediate offset (this 16 bit offset you are talking about) and that sum is the address used for the load or store. The value in the register and the offset can be pretty much anything so long as the sum is aligned to the size of the load or store. –  dwelch Apr 16 '13 at 13:42
    
But basically it's guaranteed that offsets from different registers won't collide, right? I'm not sure if the loaded value from the register is the value held in that memory address or is the address itself... –  jrhetf4xb Apr 16 '13 at 14:37
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the address comes from the sum of the value in the register plus the offset. That address is in memory space, ram and peripherals, the (general purpose) registers cannot be reached through an address in memory space. A few bits in the instruction are used to choose which register contains one part of the address. –  dwelch Apr 16 '13 at 17:48
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does that mean that all registers' addresses are spaced 8192 words apart from each other?

No. Registers don't have addresses.

Also, does it mean that the whole available memory for operating is 32 * 8192 = 262144 words?

No. These immediates are offsets to the base address used for the load/store. It allows you do specify addresses within -32768..+32767 bytes from the base address. 32768/sizeof(word) == 8192. You can simply change the value of the base register if you want to move beyond that range.
The amount of registers has nothing to do with the amount of memory you can address.

For example:

li $a0,0       # set $a0 to 0
lw $t0,0($a0)  # load a word from address 0
lw $t0,8($a0)  # load a word from address 8

lui $a0,0xffff # set the upper half-word of $a0 to 0xffff
lw $t0,4($a0)  # load a word from address 0xffff0004
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I get it now. I assumed lw loaded the address itself. Thanks for clarifying. –  jrhetf4xb Apr 16 '13 at 14:44
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