Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a class that will get a list of numbers then print them out when I need. I need to be able to make 2 objects from the class to get two different lists. Here's what I have so far

class getlist:   
    def newlist(self,*number):
        lst=[]
        self.number=number
        lst.append(number)

    def printlist(self):
        return lst

Sorry I'm not very clear, I'm a bit new to oop, can you please help me cos I don't know what I'm doing wrong. Thanks.

share|improve this question
4  
Indentation is significant in Python, so this example will never run. Please fix it so we can see what you're trying to do. –  Daniel Roseman Oct 21 '09 at 21:19
1  
why do you need objects here, lists are not enough for you? –  SilentGhost Oct 21 '09 at 21:20
    
@SilentGhost - while a valid point in general, Michael is probably making a toy program as a learning exercise. –  Tom Leys Oct 21 '09 at 23:16
add comment

2 Answers

In Python, when you are writing methods inside an object, you need to prefix all references to variables belonging to that object with self. - like so:

class getlist:   
    def newlist(self,*number):
        self.lst=[]
        self.lst += number #I changed this to add all args to the list

    def printlist(self):
        return self.lst

The code you had before was creating and modifying a local variable called lst, so it would appear to "disappear" between calls.

Also, it is usual to make a constructor, which has the special name __init__ :

class getlist:   
    #Init constructor
    def __init__(self,*number):
        self.lst=[]
        self.lst += number #I changed this to add all args to the list

    def printlist(self):
        return self.lst

Finally, use like so

>>> newlist=getlist(1,2,3, [4,5])
>>> newlist.printlist()
[1, 2, 3, [4,5]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thats great, thanks very much! –  Michael Oct 22 '09 at 8:15
    
@Michael - My pleasure :) –  Tom Leys Oct 22 '09 at 19:30
add comment

You should use "self.lst" instead of "lst". Without the "self", it's just internal variable to current method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats brilliant, that seems to have sorted it, Thanks for the help everyone! –  Michael Oct 22 '09 at 8:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.