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I am building an application which has a login through a mobile SAAS - Parse.

There are multiple error codes that could be returned from a login request. At the moment run an if statement for each error code and display a relevant alert view like this:

        if (error == nil) {
            // Something went wrong
            UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginAlertErrorTitle", @"Login Error Alert View Title") message:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginStandardError", @"Login error message text - standard error") delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:nil otherButtonTitles:NSLocalizedString(@"GlobalOKButtonTitle", @"Global Ok button title"), nil];
            [alertView show];
        } else  if ([error code] == kPFErrorObjectNotFound) {
            UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginAlertErrorTitle", @"Login Error Alert View Title") message:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginErrorObjectNotFound", @"Login error message text - object not found") delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:nil otherButtonTitles:NSLocalizedString(@"GlobalOKButtonTitle", @"Global Ok button title"), nil];
            [alertView show];
        } else  if ([error code] == kPFErrorConnectionFailed) {
            UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginAlertErrorTitle", @"Login Error Alert View Title") message:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginAlertErrorConnection", @"Login error message text - connection failed") delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:nil otherButtonTitles:NSLocalizedString(@"GlobalOKButtonTitle", @"Global Ok button title"), nil];
            [alertView show];
        } else {
            NSLog(@"A Login error occurred: %i",[error code]);
            UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginAlertErrorTitle", @"Login Error Alert View Title") message:[[error userInfo] objectForKey:@"error"] delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:nil otherButtonTitles:NSLocalizedString(@"GlobalOKButtonTitle", @"Global Ok button title"), nil];
            [alertView show];
        }

Is there a more efficient way to do the same with case/switching?

The actual error codes are setup like this:

/*! @abstract 100: The connection to the Parse servers failed. */
extern NSInteger const kPFErrorConnectionFailed;

Which makes me think I can setup this in a case statement. Would this be the correct/best way to approach this? Should it be in a separate method like handleErrorAlert: possibly?

How would I code this switch in the example above?

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

Whether you use a switch statement or a series of if-else if is really just a matter of taste in this case. Yes, the switch statement is slightly more efficient, but in a case like this, it really doesn't matter (it's not like you call this thousands of times per second). Use what you find more readable.

You might want to refactor your alert view code a little though – you're doing the same thing in all cases with only the error message being different, so there's quite a bit of repeated code. You could refactor it like this:

NSString *errorMessage = nil;
if (error == nil) {
    errorMessage = NSLocalizedString(@"LoginStandardError", @"Login error message text - standard error");
} else {
     switch ([error code]) {
          case kPFErrorObjectNotFound:
               errorMessage = NSLocalizedString(@"LoginErrorObjectNotFound", @"Login error message text - object not found");
               break;
          case kPFErrorConnectionFailed:
               errorMessage = NSLocalizedString(@"LoginAlertErrorConnection", @"Login error message text - connection failed");
               break;
          default:
               errorMessage = [[error userInfo] objectForKey:@"error"];
     }
}
UIAlertView *alertView = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:NSLocalizedString(@"LoginAlertErrorTitle", @"Login Error Alert View Title") 
                                                    message:errorMessage
                                                   delegate:self
                                          cancelButtonTitle:nil
                                          otherButtonTitles:NSLocalizedString(@"GlobalOKButtonTitle", @"Global Ok button title"), nil];
[alertView show];
share|improve this answer
    
That is perfect. From your answer I completely understand how this works, how to add more, exactly what I am after. Thanks – StuartM Apr 16 '13 at 13:08

A typedef enum being used on a switch, I think it would be the cleanest way. Something like this:

typedef enum
{
kServerError,
kInternetError,
kUnknowError
} kTypeError;

switch (aTypeError)
{
.
.
.
}

In your specific case, you take care about the message inside the switch... The UIAlertView is a common part. So:

NSString *aTitle = nil;
NSString *aMessage = nil;

switch (aTypeError)
{
    case kUnknowError:
    {
        aTitle = ...;
        aMessage = ...;
    }
    break;
}

UIAlertView *alertView = [UIAlertView alloc] ...
share|improve this answer
    
Could you elaborate on how to incorporate my existing code into a switch statement please? – StuartM Apr 16 '13 at 12:28
    
Check my Edit Stuart. – Peres Apr 16 '13 at 12:29
    
thanks but I do not understand the setup of these much. You have a typedef enum as kTypeError, then the switch of aTypeError. Where is the typedef defined anywhere within the imp file? how is a parameter passed into the switch itself? As in the returned error code that I receive? The difference in terms of the switch would be the UIAlertView information, so I thought that would be within the switch itself? – StuartM Apr 16 '13 at 12:35
    
aTypeError is a variable of the type kTypeError. The typedef enum can be defined on the pch file, or in a Constants file you have. How is it pass? Well it would be based on your own architecture (which I don't know obviously). – Peres Apr 16 '13 at 12:38
    
Instead of this typedef you can also use your const values like kPFErrorWhatever. But if you want to use a clean enum, you can also assign values to the typedef (I'll edit the post to show what I mean) – Marc Apr 16 '13 at 12:43
if (!error) {
    // Handle error (?).
}

switch ([error code]) {
    case kPFErrorObjectNotFound:
        // Handle error.
        break;
    case kPFErrorConnectionFailed:
        // Handle error.
        break;
    default:
        // Handle error.
}

This only works if the value returned by -code can be used in a switch test expression. AFAIK, int is supported—I don't know about other types.

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