Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Quick question...
Why does the first key work but not the rest? That is, the second key throws a syntax error. I've used numbers as keys before, but as soon as I write 'to' the script turns black (that is, not comment colour which is used for keys normally). If I take away the 'to' it works and throws an error on the next key.

Can I not have a number and letter combination starting with a number?

my %ranges = (
    under10 => "x < 10000",
    10to20  => "10000 <= x < 20000",
    20to30  => "20000 <= x < 30000",
    30to40  => "30000 <= x < 40000",
    40to50  => "40000 <= x < 50000",
    50to60  => "50000 <= x < 60000",
    60to70  => "60000 <= x < 70000",
    70to80  => "70000 <= x < 80000",
    80to90  => "80000 <= x < 90000",
    90to100 => "90000 <= x < 100000",
    100plus => "100000 <= x",
);
share|improve this question
    
did you tried it with qoutestrings? – user1558455 Apr 16 '13 at 12:40
    
no, good point - I've gotten so used to not using them, as I rarely use numbers as keys. Why can't I do it without them? – dgBP Apr 16 '13 at 12:42
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Put them in quotes. The documentation says:

The => operator is mostly just a more visually distinctive synonym for a comma, but it also arranges for its left-hand operand to be interpreted as a string if it's a bareword that would be a legal simple identifier.

Identifiers have to begin with a letter or underscore, so 10to30 is not a legal identifier. As a result, it doesn't get converted to a string.

share|improve this answer
    
ahhh make sense. – dgBP Apr 16 '13 at 12:44

you need to qoute them :)

my %ranges = (
    'under10' => "x < 10000",
    '10to20'  => "10000 <= x < 20000",
    '20to30'  => "20000 <= x < 30000",
    '30to40'  => "30000 <= x < 40000",
    '40to50'  => "40000 <= x < 50000",
    '50to60'  => "50000 <= x < 60000",
    '60to70'  => "60000 <= x < 70000",
    '70to80'  => "70000 <= x < 80000",
    '80to90'  => "80000 <= x < 90000",
    '90to100' => "90000 <= x < 100000",
    '100plus' => "100000 <= x",
);
share|improve this answer
    
Why though? If it is smart enough to use numbers or text or text and numbers together in that order, why not numbers and text?! weird! – dgBP Apr 16 '13 at 12:43
    
See the documentation I quoted in my answer. – Barmar Apr 16 '13 at 12:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.