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I am studying closures in Javascript on mozilla.org. There is a section called common mistake which totally blew me away. I don't know what it's really talking about.

the code is as follow,

<p id="help">Helpful notes will appear here</p>
<p>E-mail: <input type="text" id="email" name="email"></p>
<p>Name: <input type="text" id="name" name="name"></p>
<p>Age: <input type="text" id="age" name="age"></p>
function showHelp(help) {
  document.getElementById('help').innerHTML = help;
}

function setupHelp() {
  var helpText = [
      {'id': 'email', 'help': 'Your e-mail address'},
      {'id': 'name', 'help': 'Your full name'},
      {'id': 'age', 'help': 'Your age (you must be over 16)'}
    ];

  for (var i = 0; i < helpText.length; i++) {
    var item = helpText[i];
    document.getElementById(item.id).onfocus = function() {
      showHelp(item.help);
    }
  }
}

setupHelp(); 

The text appear in help

will only show the last help "Your age (you must be over 16)" and the solution is to rewrite the showHelp function outside setupHelp

function makeHelpCallback(help) {
  return function() {
    showHelp(help);
  };
}

function setupHelp() {
  var helpText = [
      {'id': 'email', 'help': 'Your e-mail address'},
      {'id': 'name', 'help': 'Your full name'},
      {'id': 'age', 'help': 'Your age (you must be over 16)'}
    ];

  for (var i = 0; i < helpText.length; i++) {
    var item = helpText[i];
    document.getElementById(item.id).onfocus = makeHelpCallback(item.help);
  }
}

setupHelp(); 

I don't understand the mechanism why it fixes the problem. Since I never use javascript to access DOM, but jQuery, I rewrote the function in jQuery

function makeHelpCallback(i) {
    return function () {
        $("#help").text(i);
    };
}
(function () {
    var helpText = [
    { 'id': 'email', 'help': 'Your e-mail address' },
    { 'id': 'name', 'help': 'Your full name' },
    { 'id': 'age', 'help': 'Your age (you must be over 16)' }
    ];

    for (var i = 0; i < helpText.length; i++) {
        var item = helpText[i];
        $("#"+item.id).focus(function () {
            new makeHelpCallback(item.help)();
        });
    }
})();

But the bug doesn't go away. As far as I know, jQuery doesn't have onfocus handler, it's impossible to bind the handler to its listener on the same level. It has to go under function(){}. And I cannot achieve the same effect as Javascript can do.

So is there anyway to write the code equivalent to the Javascript code?

As the explanation says it doesn't work because the listeners share the same environment. Whatever it means, onfocus = function(){showHelp(item.help)} executed three separate times. They should be bound accordingly. Why they would come up the same? Because showHelp is a static object? If so, adding a new modifier should do the work. And makeHelpCallback(item.help) share the same environment too. But it works. Why Why Why???

for your testing convenience, full HTML code is attached.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>
    <p id="help">Helpful notes will appear here</p>
    <p>E-mail:
        <input type="text" id="email" name="email"></p>
    <p>Name:
        <input type="text" id="name" name="name"></p>
    <p>Age:
        <input type="text" id="age" name="age"></p>

    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>

    <script>
        function makeHelpCallback(i) {
            return function () {
                $("#help").text(i);
            };
        }
        (function () {
            var helpText = [
            { 'id': 'email', 'help': 'Your e-mail address' },
            { 'id': 'name', 'help': 'Your full name' },
            { 'id': 'age', 'help': 'Your age (you must be over 16)' }
            ];

            for (var i = 0; i < helpText.length; i++) {
                var item = helpText[i];
                $("#" + item.id).focus(function () {
                    makeHelpCallback(item.help)();
                });
            }
        })();
    </script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
Here's a more simplified example of the same mistake: jsfiddle.net/5Anca –  Alexey Lebedev Apr 16 '13 at 13:43
    
The linked Mozilla page provides a perfectly adequate explanation. Suggest you read it through a few more times. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Apr 29 '13 at 0:23
    
sorry, English is my second or third language. i have done my best –  Hoy Cheung Apr 29 '13 at 13:37

4 Answers 4

I'll give you the answer below but I suggest you try to figure it out for yourself. some hints :

What exactly are you passing to the focus method?

How are your function's variables defined? Remember, you need to understand when your function is executed.

In your code :

$("#"+item.id).focus(function () {
        new makeHelpCallback(item.help)();
    });

passed a function to focus, this function is invoked later (when the focus event occurs), after the loop is finished and the item variable is set to the last item. What you should do, is pass a function with its own local variable that is bound as you call focus. This was the whole point of the makeHelpCallback! Your code should be like this :

 $("#"+item.id).focus(makeHelpCallback(item.help));

makeHelpCallback returns a function, here, write it all inline if that's clearer for you :

$("#"+item.id).focus((function (i) {
    // this function is executed immediately
    // i is bound to the correct item.
    return function () {
        $("#help").text(i);
    };
})());
share|improve this answer
    
Thx a lot! I never know what focus(function()) do. now i do! –  Hoy Cheung Apr 16 '13 at 13:49
    
hah, that would make this example more difficult to understand! I'm glad you figured it out, I think Joe's example is a lot easier to read than the mozilla one. –  David McMullin Apr 16 '13 at 13:53
    
I followed your code. It doesn't work. Sorry, I think I mixed up with something else in jQuery. Before, I wrote button.click(alert("message")); It executes no matter I click or not. Can you explain this? I thought eventhandler(function) is illegal anyway –  Hoy Cheung Apr 16 '13 at 13:58
    
Ok, to clarify, focus(function()) will execute function immediately and pass whatever function returns to focus (which, presumably will set that as an eventhandler). In this case, our makeHelpCallback function, does itself return a function! alert does not return a function ;) –  David McMullin Apr 16 '13 at 14:02
    
finally I achieved the result. I think you forgot to pass the parameter at the execution () at the end which made the code not working. Thank you for helping –  Hoy Cheung Apr 17 '13 at 5:55

A simple example is much easier to follow:

var i;
var funcsToRun = [];
for (i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
  funcsToRun.push(function() { alert(i); });
}
funcsToRun[0](); // "3"
funcsToRun[1](); // "3"
funcsToRun[2](); // "3"

This is because the "i" used by the alert is part of a closure, and is stuck to the variable "i", which has a value of 3 by the time you execute your functions. But:

var i;
var funcsToRun = [];
for (i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
  funcsToRun.push(
    (function(idx) {
      return function() { alert(idx); };
    })(i)
  );
}
funcsToRun[0](); // "0"
funcsToRun[1](); // "1"
funcsToRun[2](); // "2"

This works because instead of attaching your alert to the variable "i", you're attaching it to "idx", which is evaluated immediately as the value of "i" inside of the loop, not after it. So the inner function is run immediately, but simply returns another function of alert(0) instead of alert(i).

Using this line of thinking, you can apply this to a larger example.

share|improve this answer
    
Joe, Thank you for the very easy to understand example. I think I am missing something. What's the definition of a closure? Under what condition a function is said to be a closure? Is the closure a subset of anonymous function? –  Hoy Cheung Apr 17 '13 at 3:53
    
A closure is basically when you define a variable first, then create a function that uses that variable, but doesn't actually run it right away - that function can still use that variable, even if it's out of scope, but its value is what it is now, not what it was when the function was created. Here is a great quick-read on the subject. –  Joe Enos Apr 17 '13 at 3:55
    
So, for the first code example you gave me, funcsToRun.push(function() { alert(i); }); is executed at the moment funcsToRun[0](); is called? –  Hoy Cheung Apr 17 '13 at 4:44
    
i think i understand now. Thank you very much –  Hoy Cheung Apr 17 '13 at 4:56
    
No prob. To answer your question, funcsToRun[0] is a function that will alert i's value - it's the function() { alert(i); } part. When it's created, i has a value of zero, but that value is never used. When it's actually executed, i has a value of 3, so that's the alert that shows. –  Joe Enos Apr 17 '13 at 5:00

Thanks Joe for the simplified example. I think I can get a grip of it. I try to put Joe's example into procedure sequence. Let me know I am wrong.

var i;
var funcsToRun = [];

//for loop begins
i = 0
//i = 0
funcsToRun.push(function() { alert(i); }); // function(){ alert(i)} is not executed. i remains i.
i++ //i = 1
funcsToRun.push(function() { alert(i); });
i++ //i = 2
funcsToRun.push(function() { alert(i); });
i++ //i = 3 loop stopped. although the for loop completes, i remains in memory. It is not destroyed albeit its completion.

funcsToRun[0](); // function(){alert(i)} executes this moment, and i is 3 now.
funcsToRun[1](); // "3"
funcsToRun[2](); // "3"
share|improve this answer
    
i just realize that in javascript there is no local variable say var i = 0; for(var i = 0; i++; i<5){} what's i's value now? –  Hoy Cheung Apr 17 '13 at 5:18

Finally I achieved the result with jQuery

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>
    <p id="help">Helpful notes will appear here</p>
    <p>
        E-mail:
        <input type="text" id="email" name="email">
    </p>
    <p>
        Name:
        <input type="text" id="name" name="name">
    </p>
    <p>
        Age:
        <input type="text" id="age" name="age">
    </p>

    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>

    <script>

        (function () {
            var helpText = [
            { 'id': 'email', 'help': 'Your e-mail address' },
            { 'id': 'name', 'help': 'Your full name' },
            { 'id': 'age', 'help': 'Your age (you must be over 16)' }
            ];

            for (var i = 0; i < helpText.length; i++) {
                var item = helpText[i];
                $("#" + item.id).focus(function (msg) {
                    return function () { $("#help").text(msg); }
                }(item.help));
            }
        })();
    </script>
</body>
</html>

Thank you Joe and David

share|improve this answer

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