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Occasionally, I encounter a really weird and frustration problem with git. I commit and push some changes that includes both new files and modified files, while my coworker commits some other unrelated stuff to different files.

Now, when he pulls my changes, my newly added files are shown as untracked on his side, and my changes are reverted. Unaware of this, he commits and pushes to the repository, and my changes are completely forgotten by git.

For example, if I changed file A, then if I do git log -p A, I cannot see his revert of my changes at all, I cannot see the commit where I changed it either. But if I look at git history and find that commit, my changes are there in that commit. My commits are still there in git history, but there is no git commit that reverts my stuff, but somehow it is reverted in the latest master because the changes in my commit has been removed from the master branch somehow.

Has anyone encountered anything similar? My first thought was that he was pulling before committing his own changes, but he claims that he committed before pulling. Another possibility is that he has an IDE (PyCharm) with a git client inside (but he uses commandline git) that somehow corrupts git in his machine. Another thing to note is that he runs Windows while I run OS X, so maybe it could be a git version clash.

One other thing that might be important: Doing git log -p myfile does not show the commit in which I changed it, git log --follow -p myfile shows my change, but shows no other change that reverted it.

When I issue git log, I can see the commit where I made the change and the change related to fileA. It is only when I issue git log -p fileA I cannot see the changes to fileA. So, the commit is there, merged to master, but its effects have disappeared.

Any ideas?

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What does git log -p --full-history A show? –  Charles Bailey Apr 16 '13 at 14:11
    
I have just made an edit. git log -p A doesn't show my changes, while git log -p --full-history and git log -p --follow both show my changes, but no change as to what reverted it. –  ustun Apr 16 '13 at 14:12
    
"he runs Windows while I run OS X"... are you both using the same case conventions in your file systems and/or are using core.ignorecase as appropriate? –  Charles Bailey Apr 16 '13 at 14:23
    
If you need --follow to see the changes to your file it suggests that either you or your colleague have moved the file and that on merging, (either by not using a subtree strategy or not doing a manual fix up correctly) the change isn't being applied to the file in the new location. What did the merge conflicts look like? –  Charles Bailey Apr 17 '13 at 9:36
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1 Answer 1

It looks like the person pushing the changes (or the IDE he is using) is doing a force push (i.e. git push -f) where git overwrites the history.

To confirm this theory you could do this:

Create a fresh new clone of the repo (since in your current repo, the commits may still be reachable through some local branch or tag):

mkdir -p ~/temp-git-dir
cd ~/temp-git-dir
git clone <REPO-URL>
git fsck --unreachable --no-reflogs 2>/dev/null | grep 'unreachable commit' | awk '{print $3;}' | xargs -r -n 1 git show --oneline --name-status

If your commit is one of the commits listed, then it confirms this theory.

Solution:

Allowing force push on the repo always is a bad idea especially when the workflow involves multiple developers. You could talk to your SCM admin to see if they can disallow force push or allow it only when really required.

The workflow should involve, each developer trying to fetch the changes from the remote, and either merge or rebase the local commits with the new ones from the remote, and then push back the updated refspec to the remote.

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I ran this, but that doesn't seem to be the case. The thing is, when I issue git log, I can see the commit where I made the change and the change related to fileA. It is only when I issue git log -p fileA I cannot see the changes to fileA. So, the commit is there, merged to master, but its effects have disappeared. –  ustun Apr 17 '13 at 9:23
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