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I am new to C++ & Multithread. Recently taking a look at the Lock property...

Suppose I have a class with mutex inside. When I use the lock method on the mutex object, how can I told which part of coding is blocked/locked? Does it block/lock ALL the member functions inside the class or only the member function in which I triggered the lock?

e.g. (process_data & udf_2)

class data_wrapper
{
private:
    int x;
    some_data data;
    std::mutex m;
public:
    template<typename Function>
    void process_data(Function func)
    {
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> l(m);
    ......
    }
    void udf_2(int x)
    {
        cout << "Value is " << x; 
    ......
    }
}

=============================

=============================

One more question is that if I saw a template type T, then what's mean by T& and T&& ?

Thanks.

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Removed your C# tag. Please only use tags relevant to the question. –  tnw Apr 16 '13 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

the mutex doesnt lock your object. mutex provides exclusive access to a part of your program which falls between mutex lock and unlock.

if one thread of your program enters process_data() and is reading some variable, and at the same time another thread enters udf_2() and modifies the same variable, your program is not thread safe. In other words, just using a mutex inside an object is not enough to protect it. You must chanelize access to your variables through methods which are guarded like your method process_data(). only then your program will be thread safe.

I hope i make it clear.

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So does it mean that all member variables in the class are not locked by the std::lock_guard()?? (e.g. x, data) And it only locked process_data() but not udf_2()? –  Tsui John Apr 16 '13 at 15:19
    
yes. in fact no members are "locked". a lock only provides mutual exclusion to the threads entering that method. i.e. only one thread is allowed to pass through. and since only one thread is allowed to pass through, this achieves the effect of 'locking'. as if the code is locked by that thread and only that thread is allowed to modify something, and other threads are blocked and must wait for the locking thread to release the lock, i.e. leave the method which created the std::lock_guard –  weima Apr 17 '13 at 6:18

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/lock_guard

As you can see in the link, std::lock_guard is destructed as soon as the program goes out of scope (e.g. process_data() method ).

lock_guard does not lock all the member variables, but just ones accessed in the scope or process_data()

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So in terms of scope, does it mean that it will only lock the method in which the lock_guard() was called? –  Tsui John Apr 16 '13 at 15:20
    
yes, it means that –  FatihK Apr 16 '13 at 15:26

Using

void process_data(Function func)
{
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> l(m);
    ......
}

means that any thread that gets to this line, will not return from the constructor of the lock, until any other thread that is past the creation of the lock hasn't exited the scope. In other words, the code represented by you using ellipsis will only be executed by at most one thread at a time, effectively serializing access to the code.

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