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The following test code seems to indicate that if a class has two abstract base classes with common pure virtual methods, then these methods are "shared" in the derived class.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

struct A
{
    virtual string do_a() const = 0;
    virtual void set_foo(int x) = 0;
    virtual int get_foo() const = 0;
    virtual ~A() {}
};

struct B
{
    virtual string do_b() const = 0;
    virtual void set_foo(int x) = 0;
    virtual int get_foo() const = 0;
    virtual ~B() {}
};

struct C : public A, public B
{
    C() : foo(0) {}
    string do_a() const { return "A"; }
    string do_b() const { return "B"; }
    void set_foo(int x) { foo = x; }
    int get_foo() const { return foo; }
    int foo;
};

int main()
{
    C c;
    A& a = c;
    B& b = c;
    c.set_foo(1);
    cout << a.do_a() << a.get_foo() << endl;
    cout << b.do_b() << b.get_foo() << endl;
    cout << c.do_a() << c.do_b() << c.get_foo() << endl;
    a.set_foo(2);
    cout << a.do_a() << a.get_foo() << endl;
    cout << b.do_b() << b.get_foo() << endl;
    cout << c.do_a() << c.do_b() << c.get_foo() << endl;
    b.set_foo(3);
    cout << a.do_a() << a.get_foo() << endl;
    cout << b.do_b() << b.get_foo() << endl;
    cout << c.do_a() << c.do_b() << c.get_foo() << endl;
}

This code compiles cleanly in g++ 4.1.2 (admittedly old), using -std=c++98 -pedantic -Wall -Wextra -Werror. The output is:

A1
B1
AB1
A2
B2
AB2
A3
B3
AB3

This is what I desire, but I question whether this works generally, or only "by accident." Fundamentally, this is my question: can I depend on this behavior, or should I always inherit from a virtual base class for this type of scenario?

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This is indeed the way C++ works. You can depend on it, even though personally I find this dangerously confusing (like anything having to do with multiple inheritance, for that matter, but that's just me. And sometimes we don't really have any choice...). –  syam Apr 16 '13 at 15:06
    
This is the basic behavior of a proper C++ compiler. It would be same with even older or newer compilers. :-) –  iammilind Apr 16 '13 at 15:07
    
@syam Get familiar with the term "final overrider" and check out section 10.3 in the standard. Might take care of some of the confusion. –  Captain Obvlious Apr 16 '13 at 15:11
    
@CaptainObvlious thanks for the pointers. –  syam Apr 16 '13 at 15:34

1 Answer 1

Don't make it harder than it is. A function with the same signature as a virtual function in a base class overrides the base version. Doesn't matter how many bases you have, or whether another base has a virtual function with the same signature. So, yes, this works.

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