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In python, is it bad form to write an __init__ definition like:

class someFileType(object):
    def __init__(self, path):
        self.path = path
        self.filename = self.getFilename()
        self.client = self.getClient()
        self.date = self.getDate()
        self.title = self.getTitle()
        self.filetype = self.getFiletype()
    def getFilename(self):
        '''Returns entire file name without extension'''
        filename = os.path.basename(self.path)
        filename = os.path.splitext(filename)
        filename = filename[0]
        return filename
    def getClient(self):
        '''Returns client name associated with file'''
        client = self.filename.split()
        client = client[1] # Assuming filename is formatted "date client - docTitle"
        return client

where the initialized variables are calls to functions returning strings? Or is it considered lazy coding? It's mostly to save me from writing something.filetype as something.getFiletype() whenever I want to reference some aspect of the file.

This code is to sort files into folders by client, then by document type, and other manipulations based on data in the file name.

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Totally fine. Even makes it easier to read. –  ExP Apr 16 '13 at 15:19
    
Looks fine to me, unless one of your getFoo() functions happens to take a really long time, in which case you might want to defer it until it's actually required. –  Aya Apr 16 '13 at 15:20
1  
I would prefer a caching @property. –  Kay Apr 16 '13 at 15:20
    
@MartijnPieters Care posting this is as an answer? –  freakish Apr 16 '13 at 15:22
    
@freakish That's what the OP's code does. –  Lattyware Apr 16 '13 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Nope, I don't see why that would be bad form. Calculating those values only once when the instance is created can be a great idea, in fact.

You could also postpone the calculations until needed by using caching propertys:

class SomeFileType(object):
    _filename = None
    _client = None

    def __init__(self, path):
        self.path = path

    @property
    def filename(self):
        if self._filename is None: 
            filename = os.path.basename(self.path)
            self._filename = os.path.splitext(filename)[0]
        return self._filename

    @property
    def client(self):
        '''Returns client name associated with file'''
        if self._client is None:
            client = self.filename.split()
            self._client = client[1] # Assuming filename is formatted "date client - docTitle"
        return self._client

Now, accessing somefiletypeinstance.client will trigger calculation of self.filename as needed, as well as cache the result of it's own calculation.

In this specific case, you may want to make .path a property as well; one with a setter that clears the cached values:

class SomeFileType(object):
    _filename = None
    _client = None

    def __init__(self, path):
        self._path = path

    @property
    def path(self):
        return self._path

    @path.setter
    def path(self, value):
        # clear all private instance attributes
        for key in [k for k in vars(self) if k[0] == '_']:
            delattr(self, key)
        self._path = value

    @property
    def filename(self):
        if self._filename is None: 
            filename = os.path.basename(self.path)
            self._filename = os.path.splitext(filename)[0]
        return self._filename

    @property
    def client(self):
        '''Returns client name associated with file'''
        if self._client is None:
            client = self.filename.split()
            self._client = client[1] # Assuming filename is formatted "date client - docTitle"
        return self._client

Because property-based caching does add some complexity overhead, you need to consider if it is really worth your while; for your specific, simple example, it probably is not. The calculation cost for your attributes is very low indeed, and unless you plan to create large quantities of these classes, the overhead of calculating the properties ahead of time is negligible, compared to the mental cost of having to maintain on-demand caching properties.

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While this code certainly works, I think it would be even more clear if the _filename = None where moved into the init method rather than remain a class attribute until overridden by the property. –  jlund3 Apr 16 '13 at 15:28
2  
+1 for the doing the _filename = None outside the __init__ method. Never seen that particular idiom before. :) –  Aya Apr 16 '13 at 15:29
1  
@Aya: it's called a class attribute. Methods are really class attributes too; they are just attributes of the class that happen to resolve to a function object instead of another type. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 16 '13 at 15:31
1  
Another interesting fact of this idiom is that you call use del inst.member, so it will return the "default value" again. –  Kay Apr 16 '13 at 15:33
1  
@MartijnPieters Must... save... one... nanosecond. ;-) Nah, you're probably right. –  Aya Apr 16 '13 at 15:39

Your code is doing two different things:

a) Simplifying the class API by exposing certain computed attributes as variables, rather than functions.

b) Precomputing their values.

The first task is what properties are for; a straightforward use would make your code simpler, not more complex, and (equally important) would make the intent clearer:

class someFileType(object):
    @property
    def filename(self):
        return os.path.basename(self.path)

You can then write var.filename and you will dynamically compute the filename from the path.

@Martijn's solution adds caching, which also takes care of part b (precomputation). In your example, at least, the calculations are cheap so I don't see any benefit in doing so.

On the contrary, caching or precomputation raises consistency issues. Consider the following snippet:

something = someFileType("/home/me/document.txt")
print something.filename    # prints `document`
...
something.path = "/home/me/document-v2.txt"
print something.filename   # STILL prints `document` if you cache values

What should the last statement print? If you cache your computations, you will still get document instead of document-v2! Unless you are certain that nobody will try to change the value of the basic variable, you need to either avoid caching, or take measures to ensure consistency. The easiest way is to prohibit modifications to path-- one of the things that properties are designed to do.

Conclusion: Use properties to simplify your interface. Don't cache computations, unless it's necessitated by performance reasons. If you cache, take measures to ensure consistency, e.g. by making the underlying value read-only.

PS. The issues are analogous to database normalization (non-normalized designs raise consistency issues), but in python you have more resources for keeping things in sync.

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Just as a note: if the class is written properly, then an assignment to something.path would invalidate the cache'd filename and trigger a recalculation the next time it is requested. –  cwallenpoole Apr 16 '13 at 16:22
1  
Right, that's the alternative to prohibiting modifications altogether. But it requires either defining a setter for path (which would null all the computed values) or (for heavier applications) setting a flag or timestamp and checking it on each access to a computed value. More importantly, it requires time, thought and debugging to get it right. "If it's written properly" are the magic words. –  alexis Apr 16 '13 at 16:28
    
Cached values normally do. –  cwallenpoole Apr 16 '13 at 16:29
    
They do (or at least they should), I'm with you there. But @Martijn's much upvoted answer didn't. (It's example code, I know, but the bottom line was "this is a fine way to do it"). –  alexis Apr 16 '13 at 16:34
    
Agreed. There are plenty of uses for the "fetch once, return forever" school (a few Singleton patterns come to mind), but they can be very dangerous. –  cwallenpoole Apr 16 '13 at 18:00

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