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I have the following three address code, where n is some external constant:

   x = 0
   i = 0
L: t1 = i * 4
   t2 = a[t1]
   t3 = i * 4
   t4 = b[t3]
   t5 = t2 * t4
   x = x + t5
   i = i + 1
   if i < n goto L

I would like to optimize it as much as I can. Here is what I've come up with so far:

    x = 0
    i = 0
    t1 = -4
L:  t1 = t1+4
    t5 = a[t1] * b[t1]
    x = x + t5
    i = i + 1
    if i < n goto L

Can anyone offer corrections/additional optimizations?

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1  
Does the target architecture support complex memory addressing and is the codegen capable of recognizing simple patterns to map to that? –  harold Apr 16 '13 at 16:07
    
There isn't really a target architecture here. This is more of a pedagogical example I'm working through to learn about compiler code optimization. –  John Roberts Apr 16 '13 at 16:26
    
Ok. Too bad. Otherwise, I would have suggested calculating offsets to the end of the arrays, using a negative index (then the i < n test becomes i == 0, which would get rolled into the addition) and addressing the arrays like end[4 * i]. That's an interesting optimization IMO, but it's not target independent. –  harold Apr 16 '13 at 16:35
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd probably do something like this:

    x = 0
    t1 = (n-1)*4
L:  t5 = a[t1] * b[t1]
    x = x + t5
    t1 = t1 - 4
    if t1 >= 0 goto L

I don't know what the target machine is, but the last two instructions could typically be done with something like SUB / JNS (which saves a comparison).

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t1 = (n-1)*4 isn't valid three-address code. Also, I'm not sure how that's equivalent. T1 has to be 0 initially according to the original - there is no guarantee that n-1 will be 0. –  John Roberts Apr 16 '13 at 15:49
    
Why would it not be valid 3AC if n is constant (which you stated that it is in the question)? The value of the expression can be evaluated at compile-time. As for how it's equivalent; the code (from my understanding) calculates the sum of products between a and b. The order in which the summation is done should not matter (it doesn't affect the result), so my answer loops backwards from n-1 to 0, since that typically is more efficient. –  Michael Apr 16 '13 at 16:43
    
+1 for you. According to the Wikipedia article on TAC: "Expressions containing more than one fundamental operation are not representable in three-address code as a single instruction." So I think it would need to be broken into t1 = n-1 and t1= t1*4. Other than that, I think your representation is actually equivalent, so I retract my doubt about that. However, I'm still not convinced that this is more optimal - although you have one less instruction, you've introduced an additional MUL operation. You might be right though, I'm just not sure. –  John Roberts Apr 16 '13 at 17:37
1  
The extra mul is not in the loop though, and how is optimality even defined if you don't have a target architecture? Fewest instructions? Fewest executed instructions? Are some instructions weighted "heavier" than others? –  harold Apr 16 '13 at 17:40
    
Maybe I was a bit unclear in my previous comment: since n is constant you could evaluate (n-1)*4 at compile time, e.g. if n is 5 the 3AC instruction could be t1 = 16. –  Michael Apr 16 '13 at 17:41
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