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What is the best way to store the unit information of a column in a numpy structured array?

I tried this here, according to http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/arrays.dtypes.html

The field name may also be a 2-tuple of strings where the first string is either a “title” (which may be any string or unicode string) or meta-data for the field which can be any object, and the second string is the “name” which must be a valid Python identifier.

But how can I access/read this metadata?

import numpy as np

dtype = np.dtype([
    ('name', 'S64'),
    (('s', 'read_time'), 'uint16'),
    (('us', 'read_latency'), 'float'),
    (('B', 'read_data'), 'uint64'),
])
my_data = np.zeros(10, dtype=dtype)
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2 Answers 2

If I understand what you're looking for, you want the "descr" attribute of the dtype:

In [12]: my_data.dtype.descr
Out[12]: 
[('name', '|S64'),
 (('s', 'read_time'), '<u2'),
 (('us', 'read_latency'), '<f8'),
 (('B', 'read_data'), '<u8')]

In [13]: my_data.dtype.descr[1]
Out[13]: (('s', 'read_time'), '<u2')

In [14]: my_data.dtype.descr[1][0][0]
Out[14]: 's'

Your approach of using this for unit metadata makes sense to me. Note that dtype also has a "names" tuple with just the field names (without the units).

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thx, I think I prefer the fields attribute, because I can use the name of the column: my_data.dtype.fields['read_latency'][-1] >>> 'us' –  jackson Apr 19 '13 at 15:21
    
there is one problem with that solution: e.g. if you add another dtype with (('s', 'write_time'), 'uint16'), I get an ValueError: two fields with the same name –  jackson Apr 19 '13 at 16:24

You might want to take a look at Pint

In the docs it states as one of the features:

NumPy integration: When you choose to use a NumPy ndarray, its methods and ufuncs are supported including automatic conversion of units. For example numpy.arccos(q) will require a dimensionless q and the units of the output quantity will be radian.

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