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I recently created a generic Matrix<T> class that acts as a wrapper around a List<List<T>> collection. As far as I can tell, this class is working perfectly. I am running into a slight problem though regarding the default values of the T's.

I create an instance of Matrix<int>(3, 3), which creates a 3x3 matrix of ints, all defaulted to 0 using default(T). I know that value types (which include primitives) default to a 0 equivalent, and reference types default to null. I was wondering if it was possible to change this default value so that if a value type is passed into the Matrix, it would be populated with 5's for example, instead of 0's.

I tried creating my own struct (value type), but due to not being able to use parameterless constructors inside structs, I cannot find a way to change the default value from 0.

I suspect changing the default value is not possible, and I will have to loop through the Matrix cell by cell after it has been instantiated, but I wanted to ask on here just in case before I do that.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
 public Matrix(int width, int height) : this(width, height, default(T)) {}
 public Matrix(int width, int height, T defaultValue)
 {
     List<T> rows = new List<T>(height);
     for (int i = 0; i < height; i++)
     {
         List<T> columns = new List<T>(width);
         for (int j = 0; j < width; j++)
         { columns.Add(defaultValue); }
         rows.Add(columns);
     }
     // store `rows` wherever you are storing it internally.
 }

But as Joseph says, there's no way of setting what default(T) evaluates to.

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I didn't think of adding a constructor to define the default value. While not quite was I was looking for, it is quite nifty, and will definitely work! –  Shaun Hamman Oct 21 '09 at 23:38

There's no way to change the default value like how you're describing.

var someInt = default(int); //this will always be 0, you can't change it
var someReference = default(SomeClass); //this will always be null

Here's an msdn article on it, although it's not much more descriptive than what's already been said unfortunately.

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You can make a structure that encapsulates it's value and only exposes it with an offset of the default value that you want:

public struct DefaultFiveInteger {

   private int _value;

   public DefaultFiveInteger(int value) {
      _value = x - 5;
   }

   public static implicit operator int(DefaultFiveInteger x) {
      return x._value + 5;
   }

   public static implicit operator DefaultFiveInteger(int x) {
      return new DefaultFiveInteger(x);
   }

}

Now you can declare a variable that is initialised to the default value (0), and it will return the value with the offset:

DefaultFiveInteger x;
Console.Write(x);

Output:

5
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Minor note: If one uses exclusive-or rather than addition, the code will work for all integer values even in a checked numeric context. Additionally, it may be helpful to include am int Value get/set property, since type inference isn't sufficient to let one do everything with a DefaultFiveInteger that one can do with an int (e.g. if one had a DefaultFiveInteger d5 and a DefaultSixInteger d6, one could say d6 = (int)d5, but it might be cleaner to say d6.Value = d5.Value; –  supercat Aug 17 '13 at 19:38
    
@supercat: Good point on the checked context, that might be preferrable eventhough it's less intuitive how the values are stored. Having a setter for the value may cause problems (mutable structs are generally frowned upon), but an int getter might be useful. –  Guffa Aug 17 '13 at 21:52
    
Ancient dialects of C# would allow one to invoke property setters on structures in read-only contexts, even though such operations are usually nonsensical. Back when such usage was allowed, that was a good argument against writing property setters which modified the underlying structure. Unless one is targeting really old versions of C#, however, I don't think that argument is nearly as applicable [btw, I wonder why the makers of C# felt they had to "always" or "never" allow property setters and methods on read-only structures, rather than defining attributes to say what should be allowed?] –  supercat Aug 17 '13 at 23:29
    
@supercat: The compiler protects you from trying to change a struct where it doesn't work, but it doesn't protect you from anything that can happen when it works. If it's used as a Dictionary key for example, changing the value will make the item unaccessible. –  Guffa Aug 18 '13 at 0:07
    
If a struct is used as a dictionary key, the only way to change the copy stored in the dictionary would be to remove it and re-add it (in which case it would work just fine). Structs work better than mutable classes in that regard. My complaint is that there's no way for e.g. struct Drawing.Point to specify that its Offset method modifies this and the compiler should not allow its invocation on a read-only structure. Mutable structs could be a lot safer and more useful if an attribute were defined for such purpose. –  supercat Aug 18 '13 at 0:14

Well since you're looking at structs already, you could simulate a default value as follows:

public struct MyInt
{
    private int _defaultInt;
    public int DefaultInt
    {
        get
        {
            if (_defaultInt == 0)
                return 5;
            else
                return _defaultInt;
        }
        set
        {
            _defaultInt = value;
        }
    }
}
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This breaks if you set the int explicitly to 0. Your code will still return 5. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 21 '09 at 23:49
    
True, were I to implement it I would actually use an int? data type and check for null. If it's null, you can assume it was never set, so return 5. –  DougJones Oct 22 '09 at 17:54

My understanding of the implementation of default(T) is that the runtime, by default, zeros out the memory as the application requests it, and C# just allocates the space without ever overwriting the zeros. It just so happens that the default values of non-numeric types (e.g. the null reference, false) are represented as zeros in memory. This can lead to some weird behavior; for example, default(MyEnumType) will be zero even if you never specified an enum value to be equal to zero.

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Combining Guffa's and DougJones ideas you could offset a properties backing member.

public struct MyInt
{
    private const int INT_DEFAULT = 5;
    private int _defaultInt;
    public int DefaultInt
    {
        get { return _defaultInt + INT_DEFAULT; }
        set { _defaultInt = value - INT_DEFAULT; }
    }
}
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Actually, you could use MyInt&lt;T&gt; where T:IIntDefaultSupplier,new(), where IIntDefaultReporter contains a GetDefaultValue() method. The MyInt&lt;T&gt; class would contain a static default value, which would be loaded on first use by creating a new instance of T and calling GetDefaultValue() on it. Also, I'd suggesting using xor rather than +/- so that you avoid integer overflow issues. –  supercat Dec 21 '11 at 1:30

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