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please excuse my noobie question..

I have :

class A;
{
    public:
    A(int i) : m_i(i) {}
    int m_i;
}

A newA(i);
{
    return A(i);
}

And I want to fill the following vector, but using a loop where an object A is created with a function (newA):

vector<A*> list;

for (int i=0 ; i<3; ++i) {  A a = newA(i);  list.push_back(&a); }

That works if I use a vector<A> but not with a vector<A*> since all I do is changing the value at &a and pushing 3 times the same pointer &a.

How can I do so that I create a new A every time, and not change the value of the same pointer.

I came up with the following but I hope it's not the only way, since it includes dynamic allocation..

A newA(i);
{
    return A(i);
}

vector<A*> list;

for (int i=0 ; i<3; ++i)
{
    A a = newA(i);
    list.push_back(new A(a));
}

Note that class A is actually huge in memory, hence the pointers.

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4  
There's no sensible way to do this that does not use dynamic allocation. –  john Apr 16 '13 at 17:04
    
Please provide a short complete (compilable) example that exposes the problem, not some code fragements intermingeled with your questions. –  Oswald Apr 16 '13 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should realize the first method is bad:

 for (int i=0 ; i<3; ++i) {  A a = newA(i);  list.push_back(&a); }

You are creating a local object and then storing a pointer to it. Once you leave the loop the object will not exist anymore and you have undefined behavior. As john said there is no sensible way to do what you want to do without using dynamic allocation. As Billy noted instead of using a raw pointer you can use a shared_ptr or unique_ptr and then you don't have to worry about memory management which is possibly why you want to avoid dynamic allocation.

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+1 (and fixed typos) –  Billy ONeal Apr 16 '13 at 17:07
    
Makes sense ... now.. As it is the first time I heard of shared and unique_ptr, it looks like I have some study to do. Thanks. –  user2287453 Apr 16 '13 at 17:18

Storing a vector of pointers does not give the vector ownership of the resulting instances of A. There is going to be dynamic allocation involved in order to populate such a structure.

(Of course, in real code you should probably create a vector<unique_ptr<T>> or a vector<shared_ptr<T>> instead of a vector<T*> but that's another topic)

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It is the only way, as in your first example the object that you store the pointer to is immediately destroyed at each iteration of the for loop, as it goes out of scope.

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