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I have a label on a splash screen that is displayed for 4 seconds. I am trying to make the label display the loading process as a percentage. Obviously, this is just to show the user that the program is actually starting up and not actually "loading" anything. Is there a way that I can have the label display the percentage (going from 1% to 100%) within 4 seconds? A bit lost on how to do this.

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But wouldn't it depend on the computer performance ? I mean even though your splash screen says "Completed" because you are using fixed time, your main form may not be completed at that time. –  Tarik Oct 22 '09 at 0:25
    
Well it's actually less likely to happen in current's fast computers tho. –  Tarik Oct 22 '09 at 0:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Put a Timer control on the form, and set its Interval property to 40 and its Enabled property to true. Create a form-level variable like this:

private int _Progress = 0;

In the Timer's Tick event, put this code:

if (_Progress < 100)
{
    _Progress++;
    label1.Text = _Progress.ToString() + "%";
}
else
{
    timer1.Enabled = false;
}

Timers aren't really accurate to the millisecond, so this won't take exactly 4 seconds, but it will do the job.

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The problem is that your solution requires the program to be running, and he wants something that shows the program is loading while it is actually in the process of starting. –  James Black Oct 22 '09 at 0:03
    
@James: seriously? Do a splash screen in unmanaged C++? Howitzers tend to make a big mess when you use them on mice. :) –  MusiGenesis Oct 22 '09 at 0:07
1  
@James, I thought Nate wanted a 'cosmetic' progress text and not a real loading behind the scene. –  o.k.w Oct 22 '09 at 0:08
1  
I say 'lock' the splashscreen until the timer tick completed 4 seconds (or there about). –  o.k.w Oct 22 '09 at 0:12
1  
@Nate: I think o.k.w. just meant to not allow the splash screen to be closed until its _Progress variable has reached 100. You could expose _Progress with a public property, and then have whatever code closes the splash form just keep checking this property in a loop (with a DoEvents() or a Thread.Sleep(x)) until it reaches 100, and then close the splash form. –  MusiGenesis Oct 22 '09 at 0:38

Assuming you're talking WinForms (not WPF), the simplest way would be a timer control. Set the timeout for 40 ms (4 secs = 4000 ms. 4000 ms/100 updates = 40 ms). Create a class-level integer for tracking progress. Then your code for the OnTick event would look something like this...

if(progress < 100)
{
  progress++;
  progessLabel.Text = String.Format("Loading...  Progress: {0}%", progress);
}
else
{
  timer.Enabled = false;
}
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It's deja vu all over again! –  MusiGenesis Oct 22 '09 at 0:11

A timer with the interval set to say 100 milliseconds would be the simplest approach. Keep a count of the number of times the timer event is called and update the progress bar by 2.5 percent each tick.

While this would work, I'd say that a progress bar is not ideal for this situation. Instead just an animated graphic would be better as it gives an indication that your program is starting up, but does not mislead like a progress bar can.

I think Microsoft regularly make this mistake of using misleading progress bars in certain applications.

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Netscape used to do this with a progress bar that would go all the way to the right and then turn around and start moving back to the left, and so on for as long as the loading took (which was usually hours back in the 90s). –  MusiGenesis Oct 22 '09 at 0:13

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