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1

$form['level1']['level2'][] = array(
    'data' => 'some data',
    'type' => 'some type',
);
//etc

2

 $form = array(
   'level1' => array(
      'level2' => array(
         array(
            'data' => 'some data',
            'type' => 'some type',
         ), 
         //etc
       ),
    ),
 );
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2 is more readable than 1. –  UltimateProgrammer_BR Apr 16 '13 at 17:11
    
For the number of picoseconds difference that this will make to your scripts, efficiency is largely an irrelevance.... ask yourself instead "which is more readable?" –  Mark Baker Apr 16 '13 at 17:11
1  
Version 1 will give you a notice/warning if $form['level1']['level2'] is not already an array. –  nickb Apr 16 '13 at 17:11
    
I agree, same to efficiency? I am working with Drupal and it has a lot of nested large arrays, I am just curiuos –  drupality Apr 16 '13 at 17:11
    
imho 1 is more readable than 2, but as stated, you would need to define $form['level1']['level2'] as an array first –  winkbrace Apr 16 '13 at 17:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is absolutely microoptimizing...

Test 1: 9.0906839370728
Test 2: 8.5538339614868

But the second is more efficient. For example [] is slower as it first has to check for the last index etc... Also the first has to first check if the array already exists (at every dimension) while in the second case it is clear to PHP that there is a new array.

P.s.: But I don't really know, as the first is less to parse than the second. The parser time I didn't measure... (And I don't suppose that the arrays are now very often recreated?)

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2 is more readable than 1.

Also, if you going to play without warning, 1 would be:

$arr = array();
$arr["level1"] = array();
$arr["level1"]["level2"] = array();
//... etc
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2  
Which also makes #1 less efficient - because each level/block has to be separately defined –  Mark Baker Apr 16 '13 at 17:13
    
Yep, but lots of "programmers" plays without warnings... –  UltimateProgrammer_BR Apr 16 '13 at 17:16
    
What warnings are you referring to specifically? –  webbiedave Apr 16 '13 at 17:25
    
Notice: Undefined offset –  UltimateProgrammer_BR Apr 16 '13 at 17:30
    
Disagree, e.g: $new_array["level1"]["level2"][] = 'value' give you correct nested array without any notices (E_ALL) –  drupality Apr 16 '13 at 17:35

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