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Can we compile a list of reasons to validate JSON? There are a couple aspects I think we should consider:

  1. Security
  2. Debugging

Are there others?

Also, where should validation happen?

  1. Server
  2. Client
  3. Policy Enforcement Points? - does JSON validation make sense on an enterprise firewall? Why?
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closed as not a real question by Jack, TryTryAgain, madth3, nickhar, eandersson Apr 17 '13 at 1:19

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Are that exam questions? –  rekire Apr 16 '13 at 17:17
    
@rekire Nope, not exam questions, just pinging the dev community for their thoughts on the value of doing JSON validation. I'm trying to gauge how much effort I should put into this on a new product I'm working on (where security is very important). –  Paul Fryer Apr 16 '13 at 17:20
    
Is there something specific about JSON you're worried about? You should validate all types of data –  Ian Apr 16 '13 at 17:28
    
Well, it won't parse as JSON if it's not valid JSON. –  squint Apr 16 '13 at 17:40

2 Answers 2

JSON is just a subset of JavaScript, so validating would help to insure that it is only that subset, and that the act of parsing it wouldn't have side effects. In general I validate on the client if the error is likely the result of user error (like email addresses), and on the server for things that will result in opportunities to hack (like any string that will be presented someone else I make sure to escape it on the server). I guess I don't put that much stock in the fear that JavaScript might leak into sensitive parts of the system through JSON parsing, I'm not evaluating JavaScript server side when I parse JSON I'm just treating it as a collection of strings and numbers (like a Dicitonary in C#).

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Can we compile a list of reasons to validate JSON?

  • Data validity.

Also, where should validation happen?

  • Before data usage.
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In general I aggree with you, but you don't answer the questions. –  rekire Apr 16 '13 at 17:18
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@rekire There. Done. –  Cobra_Fast Apr 16 '13 at 17:20

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