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I have a long running process inside a HTTPHandler that I asynchronously perform using Async Await .net 4.5

This works perfectly as expected...

How can I add a timeout so that the string 'timeout' is returned if the process takes too long?

Protected Async Sub button1_Click(sender As Object, e As System.EventArgs)
    Dim asyncHandler = New AsyncHandler
    Await asyncHandler.ProcessRequestAsync(HttpContext.Current)
    Response.Write(asyncHandler.Result)
End Sub

Public Class AsyncHandler
    Inherits HttpTaskAsyncHandler

    Public Property Result As String

    Public Async Function ProcessRequestAsync(context As HttpContext) As Task
        Me.Result = Await DoLongRunningProcessAsync(context)
    End Function

    Private Function DoLongRunningProcessAsync(context As HttpContext) As Task(Of String)

        'TODO: add a timeout so that if this takes too long we return "timeout":

        Return Task.Run(Of String)(Function() DoLongRunningProcess(context))

    End Function

    Private Function DoLongRunningProcess(context As HttpContext) As String
        'perform long running process....

        Return "success"
    End Function

End Class
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3 Answers 3

I do not knot VB.NET, but I usually do this in C# like in example below:

CancellationTokenSource cancellationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();

// Make sure that we have a way to cancell long running 
Task<SomeClass> longRunningTask = GetSomethingAsync(cancellationTokenSource.Token);

// One of the task should be finished
if (longRunningTask == await Task.WhenAny(longRunningTask, Task.Delay(30000)))
{
     // Long running task completed
     SomeClass result = await longRunningTask;
}
else
{
     // Task.Delay(30000) was finished
     cancellationTokenSource.Cancel();
}
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2  
CancellationTokenSource can take a time span as a constructor argument, which greatly simplifies this approach. –  Stephen Cleary Apr 17 '13 at 0:17
1  
+1 to @StephenCleary - there's also the typical 'milliseconds as int' overload available as well - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  James Manning Apr 17 '13 at 2:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is what I finally implemented:

Created a CancellationToken with a timeout value x milliseconds

Added a try catch to catch the error: OperationCanceledException

Public Async Function ProcessRequestAsync(context As HttpContext) As Task
        Dim cts As CancellationTokenSource = New CancellationTokenSource(30000) 'eg: 30 seconds
        Try
            Me.ResultCode = Await DoLongRunningProcessAsync(HttpContext.Current, cts.Token)
        Catch ex As OperationCanceledException
            Me.ResultCode = "timeout"
        End Try
End Function

Pass the CancellationToken to the signature of DoLongRunningProcessAsync method

Detect a timeout by calling ThrowIfCancellationRequested

Private Function DoLongRunningProcessAsync(context As HttpContext, ct As CancellationToken) As Task(Of String)
        Return Await Task.Run(Of String)(
            Function()
                Dim resultCode As String = DoLongRunningProcess(context)

                'detect timeout:
                ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested()

                Return resultCode
            End Function)
End Function

Here is a great article I found that really helps:

Async in 4.5: Enabling Progress and Cancellation in Async APIs

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Normally TPL code supporting timeout does so through CancellationToken(Source) as mentioned by @outcoldman and @StephenCleary. However, in your scenario you said you wanted the timeout path to also return a string, just a different one.

Because of that, instead of using CancellationToken(Source), it will probably be simpler just to treat your timeout code as another task that produces a string and then pick whichever task (timeout task or 'real' task) finishes first and return that string.

I changed your DoLongRunningProcess (the innermost function) to be async and returning Task(Of String) just so you wouldn't have to Task.Run it.

The 'Await Await' might look odd, but Task.WhenAny returns a Task(Of Task(Of T)) so the first Await is to get to the particular Task that finished first, and then we Await that in order to get the actual string result.

Sub Main
    MainAsync().Wait()
End Sub

' Define other methods and classes here
Public Async Function MainAsync As Task
    Dim asyncHandler = New AsyncHandler
    Await asyncHandler.ProcessRequestAsync(System.Web.HttpContext.Current)
    Console.WriteLine(asyncHandler.Result)
End Function

Public Class AsyncHandler
    Inherits HttpTaskAsyncHandler

    Public Property Timeout As TimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)

    Public Property Result As String

    Public Overrides Async Function ProcessRequestAsync(context As HttpContext) As Task
        Me.Result = Await DoLongRunningProcessAsync(context)
    End Function

    Private Async Function DoLongRunningProcessAsync(context As HttpContext) As Task(Of String)

        'TODO: add a timeout so that if this takes too long we return "timeout":

        Dim workerTask As Task(Of String) = DoLongRunningProcess(context)
        Dim cancelTask As Task(Of String) = DoTimeout()

        Return Await Await Task.WhenAny(workerTask, cancelTask)

    End Function

    Private Async Function DoTimeout() As Task(Of String)
        Await Task.Delay(Timeout)

        Return "timeout"
    End Function

    Private Async Function DoLongRunningProcess(context As HttpContext) As Task(Of String)
        'perform long running process....

        Await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15))

        Return "success"
    End Function

End Class
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Great alternative approach - but should really be using cancellation tokens –  geo1701 Apr 17 '13 at 11:11
    
Agree with @geo1701. CancellationToken should be favored, as the above approach could actually end up crashing the web server in certain circumstances. –  Levi Apr 18 '13 at 6:15

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