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My problem is the following: due to LaTeX wonderfulness, I often get errors with line numbers but no indication of which file is being referred to:

l.127 \end{table}

Is there a command that would allow me to only see output line 127, say, for multiple files (ideally with wildcarding).

This would probably be pretty easy to write in Python or similar, I just wondered if there was a simple way with common shell commands.

Note: a simple way to do this with a single file is (as pointed out below)

head -n 127 filename | tail -n 1

but this fails for multiple files.

OK, have just realised that a bash loop is an option:

for i in `ls $1`;
   do echo $i; head -n $2 $1 | tail -n 1;
done;

to be executed with syntax

source lineno.sh 127 filenames
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It looks funny to be sourcing a shell script like that. Make it executable and run it: lineno.sh 127 filenames. I remove the .sh when I place such commands in my $HOME/bin directory so I can simply run: lineno 127 filenames. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 16 '13 at 18:20
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2 Answers

Also with awk:

awk 'FNR==127 {print FILENAME ":" $0; nextfile}' *.tex
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It looks funny to be sourcing a shell script like that. Make it executable and run it:

lineno.sh 127 filenames

I remove the .sh when I place such commands in my $HOME/bin directory so I can simply run:

lineno 127 filenames

The script is sub-optimal; you should avoid using ls like that (it wreaks merry hell on your file names if any of them contain spaces or other special characters).

#!/bin/sh
line=${1:?}  # Complains if there is no $1 or if it is an empty string
shift
for file in "$@"
do
    echo "$file";
    head -n $line "$file" | tail -n 1
done

I'd probably beef up the argument checking (to report the correct usage, insisting on at least a second argument), but it will work reasonably.

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