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In Oracle SQL, what's the difference between declaring a field as PRIMARY KEY as in

CREATE TABLE my_tab (
my_var NUMBER PRIMARY KEY,
...

and adding a CONSTRAINT at the end of the table definition? When should one be used over the other? Also, does NOT NULL need to be included in the code above before PRIMARY KEY?

I've looked around and can't seem to find any definitive answer on why I should use one over the other. Hopefully someone can clear that up. Thanks!

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Just to emphasise this one thing: a primary key is a constraint regardless how you define it. –  Andriy M Apr 16 '13 at 18:23
    
Always name your constraints, whichever way you do it. –  David Aldridge Apr 17 '13 at 8:47

2 Answers 2

There's no difference as far as your example: each will make my_var the primary key.

That said, there are some general differences. Two that come to mind:

  1. When you define the PRIMARY KEY separately as a CONSTRAINT you can assign a name to the constraint, whereas with the inline my_var ... PRIMARY KEY Oracle will generate a name.

  2. When you define the PRIMARY KEY separately you can define a PK made up of more than one column.


Addendum: I missed this question in the post:

Also, does NOT NULL need to be included in the code above before PRIMARY KEY?

The answer is: it doesn't need to be included, but note that Oracle will automatically create the column as NOT NULL because it doesn't allow nulls in PK values. Here's an example using SQLPlus:

SQL> CREATE TABLE c (col1 NUMBER PRIMARY KEY, col2 NUMBER);
Table created.

SQL> DESC c

Name  Null?    Type
----- -------- ------
COL1  NOT NULL NUMBER <-- Oracle automatically made this NOT NULL
COL2           NUMBER

Even if you specify NULL, Oracle will automatically change it to NOT NULL:

SQL> CREATE TABLE d (col1 NUMBER NULL PRIMARY KEY, col2 NUMBER);
Table created.

SQL> desc d;
 Name  Null?    Type
 ----- -------- ------
 COL1  NOT NULL NUMBER <-- Oracle automatically made it NOT NULL again
 COL2           NUMBER
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Just to clarify, Oracle doesn't create a NOT NULL constraint on the primary key column(s), but the inability to have a null value is part of the primary key constraint itself. What you're seeing there is the SQL*Plus DESCRIBE command inferring that the column cannot be null from the presence of the primary key constraint. –  David Aldridge Apr 17 '13 at 8:46
    
Thanks @DavidAldridge - you're absolutely right! I queried USER_CONSTRAINTS and sure enough my table C from the example above showed only the PK constraint. –  Ed Gibbs Apr 17 '13 at 12:43
    
@DavidAldridge: Interesting, that's quite unlike SQL Server. I'm not really sure whether the NULL/NOT NULL thing is a constraint or a column property in SQL Server, but in either event the NOT NULL implied by the PRIMARY KEY constraint remains in effect after the constraint is dropped, which this demo demonstrates. –  Andriy M Apr 26 '13 at 12:31
    
@AndriyM Definitely an area not covered by ANSI, I'd think, so the vendors define whatever behaviour they think appropriate. –  David Aldridge Apr 26 '13 at 13:32

The documentation on constraints does cover this.

The first method is called "inline". The second is called "out of line".

There is only one real difference. If your primary key has more than one key, then you need to use the "out of line" syntax. Otherwise, they do the same thing.

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