Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I access a list from a class constructor in python, to use in another class method? For example:

Class Data():
    def __init__(self):
        list1 = ["a", "e", "i", "o", "u"]

    def __length__():
        length = len(list1)
        print(length)

To print the length of the current list.

share|improve this question
    
As a side note, __attribute__ style names are reserved for use by python. having a __length__(self) method could cause problems with some future version of python which decides to make __length__ do something special. –  mgilson Apr 16 '13 at 18:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pay attention to the self parameter passed to every instance method. It's the instance itself. It's like this in C++ or Java, just passed explicitly. And you should use it explicitly (type import this if in doubt).

So, as other posters mentioned, you need something like this:

class Data():
  def __init__(self):
    self.vowels = ['a', 'e', 'u', 'i', 'o']

  def __len__(self): # if you want to use len() on your object
    return len(self.vowels) # refer to the list defined in constructor 
share|improve this answer

You need use self attribue, according python code style "Always use self for the first argument to instance methods.", Try this :

class Data():
    def __init__(self):
        self.list1 = ["a", "e", "i", "o", "u"]

    def __length__(self):
        length = len(self.list1)
        print(length)
share|improve this answer
    
@AshwiniChaudhary thanks,thanks, didn't notice –  Maxi Baez Apr 16 '13 at 18:19

To solve your problem, you should use instance attributes:

class Data():
    def __init__(self):
        self.list1 = ["a", "e", "i", "o", "u"]

    def __length__(self):
        length = len(self.list1)
        print length

The idea here is not that you're "accessing the constructor", but you are accessing an attribute of an instance of this class. The class Data might have attributes: list1, 'list2,vowels,consonants`, you name it. You will want to set these in the constructor, and then you can change or access them in class methods.

But perhaps you could do even better. Consider these two thoughts:

  1. Why do you want to call your method __length__? Perhaps something more descriptive (and less abusive of those underscores) would help e.g. def print_number_of_vowels(self).
  2. The name Data is a pretty vague, considering making it more specific e.g. AlphabetData.

Perhaps something more like:

class AlphabetData():
    def __init__(self):
        self.vowels = ["a", "e", "i", "o", "u"]

    def print_number_of_vowels(self):
        print len(self.vowels)
share|improve this answer
    
These are not class attributes, but instance attributes. Big difference. A class attribute belongs to the class itself, while an instance attribute belongs to the instance (and is, potentially, different for each one). –  Lattyware Apr 16 '13 at 18:09
    
lowercase: class –  Don Question Apr 16 '13 at 18:11
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary -- I decided to put it in there ... –  mgilson Apr 16 '13 at 18:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.