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It could well be i am making myself look very stupid just now but is the following the correct way to get interval[1,-1] scaled output from fft based autocorrelation? The scaling should be what numpy.correlate(x,x, mode="same") does to scale the results to a [1, -1] interval.

def autocorrelate(x):
  fftx = fft(x)
  fftx_mean = np.mean(fftx)
  fftx_std = np.std(fftx)

  ffty = np.conjugate(fftx)
  ffty_mean = np.mean(ffty)
  ffty_std = np.std(ffty)

  result = ifft((fftx - fftx_mean) * (ffty - ffty_mean))
  result = fftshift(result)
  return [i/(fftx_std * ffty_std) for i in result.real]

i have run some test data and it sure looks like it does what it should but i am not perfectly sure i haven't screwed something up and just accidentally get somewhat correct results ;)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maple's AutoCorrelation function seems to be using the definition

def AutoCorrelation(x):
    x = np.asarray(x)
    y = x-x.mean()
    result = np.correlate(y, y, mode='full')
    result = result[len(result)//2:]
    result /= result[0]
    return result 

In [189]: AutoCorrelation([1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2])
Out[189]: array([ 1.   , -0.875,  0.75 , -0.625,  0.5  , -0.375,  0.25 , -0.125])

Now, it would be interesting to see if we can reproduce this result using FFT. NumPy's np.fft.fft is a periodic convolution, while np.correlate is a linear convolution. To use np.fft.fft, we need to add enough zero-padding to make the calculation essentially linear:

def autocorrelation(x):
    """
    Compute autocorrelation using FFT
    """
    x = np.asarray(x)
    N = len(x)
    x = x-x.mean()
    s = fft.fft(x, N*2-1)
    result = np.real(fft.ifft(s * np.conjugate(s), N*2-1))
    result = result[:N]
    result /= result[0]
    return result

Here are some tests which confirm that AutoCorrelation and autocorrelation agree and return the same values as those returned by Maple's AutoCorrelation function -- at least for the limited examples I know about.

import numpy as np
fft = np.fft

def autocorrelation(x):
    """
    Compute autocorrelation using FFT
    The idea comes from 
    http://dsp.stackexchange.com/a/1923/4363 (Hilmar)
    """
    x = np.asarray(x)
    N = len(x)
    x = x-x.mean()
    s = fft.fft(x, N*2-1)
    result = np.real(fft.ifft(s * np.conjugate(s), N*2-1))
    result = result[:N]
    result /= result[0]
    return result

def AutoCorrelation(x):
    x = np.asarray(x)
    y = x-x.mean()
    result = np.correlate(y, y, mode='full')
    result = result[len(result)//2:]
    result /= result[0]
    return result 

def autocorrelate(x):
    fftx = fft.fft(x)
    fftx_mean = np.mean(fftx)
    fftx_std = np.std(fftx)

    ffty = np.conjugate(fftx)
    ffty_mean = np.mean(ffty)
    ffty_std = np.std(ffty)

    result = fft.ifft((fftx - fftx_mean) * (ffty - ffty_mean))
    result = fft.fftshift(result)
    return [i / (fftx_std * ffty_std) for i in result.real]


np.set_printoptions(precision=3, suppress=True)

"""
These tests come from
http://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/Maple/view.aspx?path=Statistics/AutoCorrelation
http://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/Maple/view.aspx?path=updates%2fMaple15%2fcomputation
"""
tests = [
    ([1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2], [1,-0.875,0.75,-0.625,0.5,-0.375,0.25,-0.125]),
    ([1,-1,1,-1], [1, -0.75, 0.5, -0.25]),
    ]

for x, answer in tests:
    x = np.array(x)
    answer = np.array(answer)
    # print(autocorrelate(x)) 
    print(autocorrelation(x))
    print(AutoCorrelation(x))
    assert np.allclose(AutoCorrelation(x), answer)
    print

"""
Test that autocorrelation() agrees with AutoCorrelation()
"""
for i in range(1000):
    x = np.random.random(np.random.randint(2,100))*100
    assert np.allclose(autocorrelation(x), AutoCorrelation(x))
share|improve this answer
    
I was referring to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autocorrelation. The definition there states that the statisitcal based autocorreltion should be scaled from [1,-1] while in signal processing one usually foregoes that scaling. I would - however - really like that scaling but still keep the fft approach –  Skazarok Apr 16 '13 at 19:20
    
And to further explain: The reason i asked is that i am unsure if it is "allowed" to scale the output of the fft function using the mean value of the already transformed array. It seems to do what i want it to but i was mainly just guessing and didn't see a solid reason why it should not be allowed... –  Skazarok Apr 16 '13 at 19:23
    
I'm not sure how Maple is calculating the autocorrelation, but it says it is using the discrete FFT. It shows some examples whose results do not correspond well with either of our definitions of autocorrelation. I do not know the correct solution to your question, but I would be cautious about proceeding with the definition you are currently using. –  unutbu Apr 16 '13 at 20:31
    
Thanks a lot for all the work you have put into this. I did some testing myself and came to the same results. –  Skazarok Apr 18 '13 at 10:58

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