Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have two STL maps std::map<int, int> foo = {{1, 0}, {2, 0}, {3, 0}, {4, 0}, {5, 0}, {6, 0}}; and std::map<int, int> bar = {{2, 0}, {4, 0}, {5, 0}};

I want to find if bar is a subset of foo.

Since the elements are sorted in map, I would think to find the first element from bar in foo, and then find consecutive elements from bar in foo from that location.

The problem here is I'm not able to figure out a way to do that with STL maps in cpp. Can I reduce the search range in map for every find from a location in map to the end of the map?

I hope I explained the problem.

share|improve this question
4  
If those are maps, are you listing the keys? Or the value types? Or are they sets? –  Andy Prowl Apr 16 '13 at 19:09
1  
your map looks like set –  taocp Apr 16 '13 at 19:10
    
or anything else –  tinky_winky Apr 16 '13 at 19:10
    
Sorry for confusion. These are keys, map is "map<int,SomeInfo*>". I am interested in finding if second map has keys subset of keys in first map. –  saurabh Apr 16 '13 at 19:10
5  
@H2CO3: absurd nitpicking... STL is a well known term, and it is not incorrectly used here. It is not like he was calling std::iostream STL. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 16 '13 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use std::includes algorithm with a custom comparator that compares only the keys:

#include <map>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::map<int, int> foo = {{1, 0}, {2, 0}, {3, 0}, {4, 0}, {5, 0}, {6, 0}};
    std::map<int, int> bar = {{2, 0}, {4, 0}, {5, 0}};
    typedef std::pair<int,int> pair;

    std::cout <<
       std::includes(foo.begin(), foo.end(), bar.begin(), bar.end(),
           [](const pair& p1, const pair& p2)
           {
               return p1.first < p2.first;
           });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, cool, +1. :) –  Alexander Shukaev Apr 16 '13 at 19:34
    
thanks, it worked for me. –  saurabh Apr 16 '13 at 19:53
2  
Please mark this as accepted if it answered your question, saurabh. –  Nate Hekman Apr 16 '13 at 20:45

You could extract key sets (set1 and set2) of both maps (foo and bar), and as long as they are sorted, you can do the following:

if (std::includes(set1.begin(), set1.end(),
                  set2.begin(), set2.end())) {
  // ...
}

See std::includes.

share|improve this answer
    
Why extract the keys? You can do it on the fly, see my answer. –  jrok Apr 16 '13 at 19:30

A simple way is to use Boost.Range in combination with boost::includes:

using namespace boost::adaptors;
bool result = includes(foo | map_keys, bar | map_keys);

Here is how a minimal, complete program could look like (mapped values are disregarded):

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/range.hpp>
#include <boost/range/adaptors.hpp>
#include <boost/range/algorithm.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::map<int, int> foo = {{1, 0}, {2, 0}, {3, 0}, {4, 0}, {5, 0}, {6, 0}};
    std::map<int, int> bar = {{2, 0}, {4, 0}, {5, 0}};

    using namespace boost::adaptors;
    std::cout << includes(foo | map_keys, bar | map_keys);
}

Here is a live example.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.