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What does ~ mean when I use it before an image?

For example:

K = bwmorph(~J,'thin','inf');

Where J is a binary image.

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adding to fpe's answer, ~J is a binary matrix where all the non-zero values of J are zeros and all the zero values of J are ones. –  bla Apr 16 '13 at 19:48
1  
I recommend you try to investigate these things yourself. In the MatLab environment it's immensely easy to construct a simple binary test image, apply the ~ operator and see the result. –  paddy Apr 16 '13 at 19:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is a logical not.

For more detail, please type in

doc ~

EDIT

bwmorph(BW,operation)

works explicitely on binary images, therefore ~BW only implies that zeros are position-changed with one, as some of the other members pointed out.

Please check this out:

A = eye(5)

~A

In your case, black will turn into white and viceversa.

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... before an image? –  Robert Harvey Apr 16 '13 at 19:46
    
@RobertHarvey If it's a binary image...sure –  Bart Apr 16 '13 at 19:48
    
What is the result? false? An inverted image? –  Robert Harvey Apr 16 '13 at 19:49
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An inverted image. –  Bart Apr 16 '13 at 19:49
    
aha , ok thank you :) –  rand Apr 16 '13 at 20:00

It's the logical not operator in MATLAB. Read more in the MATLAB help:

help not

In your case, it basically inverts the colors of your binary image. This is because not(1) = 0 and not(0) = 1, with the usual interpretations about 0/1 vs. false/true.

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Ok, this comment may not be constructive, but one must admit that typing "help not" in a CLI is a very geeky joke. I'm gonna share this with my colleagues. Thanks for the idea! :-) –  CST-Link Apr 16 '13 at 19:53

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