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If you have a pattern matching (case) in Scala, for example:

foo match {
  case a: String => doSomething(a)
  case f: Float =>  doSomethingElse(f)
  case _ => ? // How does one determine what this was?
}

Is there a way to determine what type was actually caught in the catch-all?

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Ideally you'd not be trafficking in Any, which is the only common supertype of String and Float. –  Randall Schulz Apr 17 '13 at 0:02
    
I have an actor that is called from a 3rd party library that has not documented all the types it sends.... But thanks for the quick answers! –  David Weber Apr 17 '13 at 6:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
foo match {
  case a: String => doSomething(a)
  case f: Float =>  doSomethingElse(f)
  case x => println(x.getClass)
}
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case x => println(x.getClass)

Too easy :-)

Basically, you just need to bind the value in your catch-all statement to a name (x in this case), then you can use the standard getClass method to determine the type.

If you're trying to perform specific logic based on the type, you're probably doing it wrong. You could compose your match statements as partial functions if you need some 'default' cases that you don't want to define inline there. For instance:

scala> val defaultHandler: PartialFunction[Any, Unit] = {
     | case x: String => println("String: " + x)
     | }
defaultHandler: PartialFunction[Any,Unit] = <function1>

scala> val customHandler: PartialFunction[Any, Unit] = {
     | case x: Int => println("Int: " + x)
     | }
customHandler: PartialFunction[Any,Unit] = <function1>

scala> (customHandler orElse defaultHandler)("hey there")
String: hey there
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1  
Classes aren't really types. Potentially many types map to a single class. –  Randall Schulz Apr 17 '13 at 0:01

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