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I keep going around in circles on this data trigger so it is not working...

I have a button that has a border for a default dropshadow. However, I want to create a dep property to be used to toggle this. Yet, I never get to the point where the effect is being set.

<Style x:Key="RoundedButton" TargetType="{x:Type Button}">
<Setter Property="Template">
 <Setter.Value>
  <ControlTemplate TargetType="ctrls:RoundedButton">
   <Grid>
    <Border>
     <Border.Style>
      <Style TargetType="ctrls:RoundedButton">
       <Style.Triggers>
        <Trigger Property="IsDropShadowVisible" Value="True">
         <Setter Property="Effect">
          <Setter.Value>
           <DropShadowEffect ShadowDepth="1"/>
          </Setter.Value>
         </Setter>
        </Trigger>
       </Style.Triggers>
      </Style>
     </Border.Style>

This is based off of a button, but is implemented as the custom user control...This is legacy code...

share|improve this question
    
Post the full XAML. Also, that DataTrigger doesn't make sense. Use a regular Trigger Property=IsDropShadowVisible.. etc... –  HighCore Apr 16 '13 at 20:09
    
@HighCore updated my answer –  Justin Pihony Apr 16 '13 at 20:12
    
Your XAML doesn't make sense. You have a Style TargetType="Button" and then a ControlTemplate TargetType="ctrls:RoundedButton". I suggest you look at this tutorial for introductory XAML stuff. –  HighCore Apr 16 '13 at 20:14
    
@HighCore yah....I just added a note to that...I am trying to fix that, but it is embedded elsewhere and is causing issues...is there any way to do this otherwise? Or do I need to fix this legacy stuff –  Justin Pihony Apr 16 '13 at 20:15
    
legacy? I don't think that means what you think that means. –  Lee Louviere Apr 16 '13 at 20:18
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I have here works Did this in a new WPF window. No other code-behind than what you see here.

<Window.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type local:ShadowButton}">
        <Setter Property="Template">
            <Setter.Value>
                <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:ShadowButton}">
                    <Button Name="Button"></Button>
                    <ControlTemplate.Triggers>
                        <Trigger Property="IsDropShadowVisible" Value="True">
                            <Setter TargetName="Button" Property="Effect">
                                <Setter.Value>
                                    <DropShadowEffect ShadowDepth="1"/>
                                </Setter.Value>
                            </Setter>
                        </Trigger>
                    </ControlTemplate.Triggers>
                </ControlTemplate>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>

<!-- snip code -->

<local:ShadowButton Height="10" Width="10" IsDropShadowVisible="true"/>

Code-behind:

public class ShadowButton : Button
{
    public DependencyProperty IsDropShadowVisibleProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("IsDropShadowVisible", typeof(Boolean), typeof(ShadowButton), new PropertyMetadata(false));
    public Boolean IsDropShadowVisible
    {
        get { return (Boolean)GetValue(IsDropShadowVisibleProperty); }
        set { SetValue(IsDropShadowVisibleProperty, value); }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you take into account this comment, then this fixed my problem: Just remove the border style, name the border, then give the setter that targetname. Done. –  Justin Pihony Apr 16 '13 at 20:49
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