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Suppose two (or more) concurrently-running Java processes need to check for the existence of a file, create it if it doesn't exist, and then potentially read from that file over the course of their runs. We want to protect ourselves against the possibility of multiple writer processes clobbering each other and/or reader processes reading an incomplete or inconsistent version of the file.

What we're currently doing to arbitrate this situation is to use Java NIO FileLocks. One process manages to acquire an exclusive lock on the file to be created using FileChannel.tryLock() and creates it, while the other concurrently-running processes fail to acquire a lock and fall back to using an in-memory version of the file for their runs.

Locking is causing various problems for us on our compute farm, however, so we're exploring alternatives. So my question to you is: is there a way to do this safely without using file locks?

Could, eg., the processes write to independent temporary files when they find a file doesn't exist, and then more or less "atomically" move the temp file(s) into place after they've been written? In this scenario, we might end up with multiple writer processes, but that would be ok provided that any processes reading from the file always read one version or another, and not a mix of two or more versions. However, I don't think all operating systems guarantee that if you have a file open for reading, you'll continue reading from the original version of the file even if it's overwritten mid-way through the read.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

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1 Answer 1

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Suppose two (or more) concurrently-running Java processes need to check for the existence of a file, create it if it doesn't exist, and then potentially read from that file over the course of their runs.

I don't quite understand the create and read part of the question. If you are looking to make sure that you have a unique file then you could use new File(...).createNewFile() and check to make sure that it returns true. To quote from the Javadocs:

Atomically creates a new, empty file named by this abstract pathname if and only if a file with this name does not yet exist. The check for the existence of the file and the creation of the file if it does not exist are a single operation that is atomic with respect to all other filesystem activities that might affect the file.

This would give you a unique file that only that process (or thread) would then "own". I'm not sure how you were planning on letting the writer know which file to write to however.

If you are talking about creating a unique file that you write do and then moved into a write directory to be consumed then the above should work. You would need to create a unique name in the write directory once you were done as well.

You could use something like the following:

private File getUniqueFile(File dir, String prefix) {
    long suffix = System.currentTimeMillis();
    while (true) {
        File file = new File(dir, prefix + suffix);
        // try creating this file, if true then it is unique
        if (file.createNewFile()) {
           return file;
        }
        // someone already has that suffix so ++ and try again
        suffix++;
    }
}

As an alternative, you could also create a unique filename using UUID.randomUUID() or something to generate a unique name.

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The multiple processes are often running on different machines and accessing the files over NFS or similar. Do you think the atomicity guarantee of File.createNewFile() still applies in this case? –  David Apr 16 '13 at 20:31
    
No idea @David. I didn't see any mention of NFS in your question. I think you are going to have to see how NFS handles the FileSystem.createFileExclusively(...) call. –  Gray Apr 16 '13 at 20:36

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