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I have a small program that is not much more than a stop-watch that runs and updates a view. Every 8 seconds the stop watch will increment a counter also on that view. So at 0, 8, 16, 24 seconds etc... the counter is 1, 2, 3, 4 etc..

In the XAML for my view I have a couple of items, one of which is the TextBlock for holding my stopwatch and the other is another TextBlock for displaying how many times "8 seconds has passed".

<StackPanel Grid.Column="0" Orientation="Horizontal" HorizontalAlignment="Left" >
    <Label Content="Run Time:" FontSize="16" FontWeight="Bold" Margin="10,0,0,0"/>
    <TextBlock Name="ClockTextBlock" Text="00:00:00:00" FontSize="16" Foreground="Red" Margin="5" FontWeight="Bold"/>
</StackPanel>
<StackPanel Grid.Column="1" Orientation="Horizontal" HorizontalAlignment="Right">
    <Label Content="Sample Count:" FontSize="16" FontWeight="Bold" Margin="10,0,0,0"/>
    <TextBlock Text="0" Name="SampleCountDigit" Foreground="Red" FontSize="16" FontWeight="Bold" Margin="5"/>
</StackPanel> 

The code behind for this xaml file has the code for setting up the dispatch timer that will create my stop-watch.

public partial class StopWatchView: UserControl
{
    private DispatcherTimer dt = new DispatcherTimer();
    private Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();

    private string _currentTime = string.Empty;
    private int _sampleCount = 0;

    public StopWatchView()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        dt.Tick += new EventHandler(dt_Tick);
        dt.Interval = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 1);
    }

    private void dt_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (stopWatch.IsRunning)
        {
            TimeSpan ts = stopWatch.Elapsed;

            _currentTime = String.Format("{0:00}:{1:00}:{2:00}.{3:00}", ts.Hours, ts.Minutes, ts.Seconds,
                                        ts.Milliseconds/10);

            ClockTextBlock.Text = _currentTime;

            if (ts.Seconds%8 == 0)
            {
                _sampleCount++;
                SampleCountDigit.Text = _sampleCount.ToString();
            }
        }
    }

    private void StartButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ClockTextBlock.Foreground = Brushes.Green;
        stopWatch.Start();
        dt.Start();
    }

The Problem

The code works properly for updating my stop-watch so that it looks and acts like a stop-watch should. The view updates without a hitch every time the dt_tick() is called and the if(stopWatch.IsRunning) evaluates to true. Where I am running into a problem is when _sampleCount is incremented when if(ts.Seconds%8 == 0) is true. I dont know if its a race condition (because I am still learning threads) but the TextBox="SampleCountDigit" updates rapidly and erratically not at intervals of 8 seconds as it should. Honestly, from what I know of threading I don't understand why this happening or why this would be a race condition when both of these member variables (_sampleCount and _currentTime) are updated within the dt_Tick() event handler code.

Why would this be happening and what can I do to update my SampleCountDigit (view) so that every 8 seconds as it should? Should a new thread be written around the update of this element?

EDIT To give a better insight into the behavior of the problem, when I set a break-point on SampleCountDigit.Text = _sampleCount.ToString(); the code stops perfectly at 8, 16, 24 seconds and so on... and the SampleDigitCounter on my view updates properly thereafter.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is caused because you've specified your timer interval to be 1 millisecond. So dt_tick() may be being called up to 1000 times per second, during which the value of ts.Second doesn't change. This will cause _sampleCount to be incremented by up to 1000 every 8 seconds.

In reality, dt_tick will be called at a lower rate determined by the capabilities of the DispatcherTimer and the speed of your machine.

You may want to modify your code something like:

int _lastSeconds = -1;

private void dt_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (stopWatch.IsRunning)
    {
        ...

        if (ts.Seconds != _lastSeconds && ts.Seconds%8 == 0)
        {
            _lastSeconds = ts.Seconds;
            _sampleCount++;
            SampleCountDigit.Text = _sampleCount.ToString();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Based on your statement about processor speeds, will changing the resolution of the interval help? So instead of milliseconds, I simply set dt.Interval = new TimeSpan(0,0,0,1)? –  Isaiah Nelson Apr 16 '13 at 21:02
1  
I'm probably thinking of Windows Forms timers which had a resolution of >= ~50ms. The DispatcherTimer may in fact fire 1000/sec I would have to try it. Of course if dt_tick takes > 1ms to run then that would limit you the rate. Of course setting the interval to 1 second would be much more sensible all round. –  Phil Apr 16 '13 at 21:08

Your gut feel that this is not a threading problem is correct, since you are modifying both variables in the same method, and therefore, on the same thread.

Your problem is actually quite straight-forward. I presume that your dt_tick() method is being called more than once per second. Now if you happen to fire the event two or three times in the same second and for that particular second "ts.Seconds" happens to be a multiple of 8, you'll increment your counter three times.

Another slight issue you have here is that you're using "ts.Seconds" instead of "ts.TotalSeconds", which we'll see the impact of in the solutions below.

The best way to fix this, would be to use ts.TotalSeconds to get an absolute number of seconds since the stopwatch started, and keep track of that value each time you update the counter. Then you can compare between the last update time and now, to see if 8 seconds has passed. It is important to use ts.TotalSeconds rather than ts.Seconds, because ts.Seconds is simply the "seconds hand", and only moves within the range 0..59, so you could get wierd things like time going backwards etc if you use it.

// Outside your dt_tick()
double lastIncrementTime = 0.0d;

// Inside your dt_tick(), just after ClockTextBlock.Text = _currentTime;
if (ts.TotalSeconds - lastIncrementTime >= 8.0d)
{
    // increment counter etc, then...
    lastIncrementTime = ts.TotalSeconds;
}

This way, no matter how frequently you run the code, you are actually checking to see if 8 seconds have passed since the last time you incremented the counter, rather than checking to see if the current value on the seconds hand is a multiple of 8.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explaining caveat of not using TotalSeconds. –  Isaiah Nelson Apr 16 '13 at 21:09

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