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I have an SQL connection which outputs an array of objects and it is sorted like so

(
    [0] => listItem Object
        (
            [name] => TV
            [parentId] => 0
            [id] => 1
            [childs] => Array
                (
                    [0] => listItem Object
                        (
                            [name] => mini tv
                            [parentId] => 1
                            [id] => 29
                            [childs] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => listItem Object
                                        (
                                            [name] => tiny TV
                                            [parentId] => 29
                                            [id] => 548
                                        )

                                )

                        )

                )

        )

    [1] => listItem Object
        (
            [name] => RADIO
            [parentId] => 0
            [id] => 2
            [childs] => Array
                (
                    [0] => listItem Object
                        (
                            [name] => mini radio
                            [parentId] => 2
                            [id] => 30
                        )

                    [1] => listItem Object
                        (
                            [name] => Tiny LCD
                            [parentId] => 2
                            [id] => 551
                        )

                )

        )

    [2] => listItem Object
        (
            [name] => Stereo
            [parentId] => 0
            [id] => 550
        )

    [3] => listItem Object
        (
            [name] => Joe the Plumber
            [parentId] => 0
            [id] => 568
            [childs] => Array
                (
                    [0] => listItem Object
                        (
                            [name] => Joe the Plumber
                            [parentId] => 568
                            [id] => 569
                            [childs] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => listItem Object
                                        (
                                            [name] => Joe the Plumber
                                            [parentId] => 569
                                            [id] => 570
                                            [childs] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [0] => listItem Object
                                                        (
                                                            [name] => Joe the Plumber
                                                            [parentId] => 570
                                                            [id] => 571
                                                        )

                                                )

                                        )

                                )

                        )

                )

        )

)

I am sorting it this way since I want to output it as a with the proper hierarchy.

I have this function

function buildHTML($tree){
  echo 'building tree';
  foreach($tree as $item){
      $topItem = makeHtmlListItem($item);
       $pos = strpos($topItem, '</li>');
       $newItem = substr($topItem,0 , $pos);
       echo $newItem;
        foreach($item->childs as $subItem){
         echo '<ul>' . makeHtmlListItem($subItem) . '</ul>' ;
        }
echo '</li>';
 }
}

But it only gets to the second level. How do I get to the bottom with an arbitrary depth? I managed to do it with recursion but now I want to do it without recursion and I am going nuts.

share|improve this question
    
No reason to avoid recursion. But good exercise. –  Kamil Szot Apr 16 '13 at 21:10
    
Thank you I am aware of that and doing it for the exercise. –  raam86 Apr 16 '13 at 21:11
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could always use the stack approach, pretty much what you would use before recursion was a possibility — this is all that recursively calling a function is really doing anyway, it's just stacking parameters instead.

The following just uses a stacked array (FILO) to store the current array being dealt with and another stacked array to keep track of the current array index at that level. I've used two arrays for simplicity but you could construct a structure that could store both array and current index in the same object. The following obvsiously will only work for non-associative arrays:

Your base class:

class listItem {
  public $name = '';
  public $parentId = 0;
  public $id = 0;
  public $childs = NULL;
  public function __construct($name, $parentId, $id, $childs = NULL){
    $this->name = $name;
    $this->parentId = $parentId;
    $this->id = $id;
    $this->childs = $childs;
  }
}

Your base data:

$data = array(
  new listItem('TV', 0, 1,
    array(
      new listItem('mini tv', 1, 29,
        array(
          new listItem('tiny tv', 29, 548),
        )
      ),
    )
  ),
  new listItem('RADIO', 0, 2,
    array(
      new listItem('mini radio', 2, 30),
      new listItem('Tiny LCD', 2, 551),
    )
  ),
  new listItem('Stereo', 0, 550),
  new listItem('Joe the Plumber', 0, 568,
    array(
      new listItem('Joe the Plumber', 568, 569,
        array(
          new listItem('Joe the Plumber', 569, 570,
            array(
              new listItem('Joe the Plumber', 570, 571)
            )
          )
        )
      )
    )
  ),
);

A traverse method:

function traverse( $data ){
  $stack = array( $data );
  $place = array( 0 );
  $build = '<ul>';
  while ( $stack ) {
    $a = end($stack);
    $i = end($place);
    $k = key($place);
    $place[$k]++;
    if ( isset($a[$i]) ) {
      $item = $a[$i];
      $build .='<li><span>' . $item->name . '</span>';
      if ( $item->childs ) {
        $build .= '<ul>';
        $stack[] = $item->childs;
        $place[] = 0;
      }
    }
    else {
      array_pop($stack);
      array_pop($place);
      $build .= '</ul>' . ( $stack ? '</li>' : '' );
    }
  }
  return $build;
}

usage:

echo traverse( $data );

with comments:

function traverse( $data ){
  /// prep the stack
  $stack = array( $data );
  $place = array( 0 );
  /// I've tailored the build to be for list items
  $build = '<ul>';
  /// loop until we have no more stack
  while ( $stack ) {
    /// you could improve optimisation at the cost of readability
    /// by storing the end offsets rather than using `end()`.
    $a = end($stack); /// current array
    $i = end($place); /// current offset in that array
    $k = key($place); /// key used to update current offset
    /// update the current levels array index
    $place[$k]++;
    /// if we have an item, investigate
    if ( isset($a[$i]) ) {
      $item = $a[$i];
      /// output our list item
      $build .='<li><span>' . $item->name . '</span>';
      /// if we have children, level up the stack
      if ( $item->childs ) {
        $build .= '<ul>';
        $stack[] = $item->childs; /// adding child array for next iteration
        $place[] = 0; /// start scanning childs from 0 offset
      }
    }
    /// if no more items at this level, level down the stack
    else {
      array_pop($stack);
      array_pop($place);
      /// always output a ul at this point, but not an li at the end
      $build .= '</ul>' . ( $stack ? '</li>' : '' );
    }
  }
  /// the final html returned
  return $build;
}

output:

<ul>
  <li>
    <span>TV</span>
    <ul>
      <li>
        <span>mini tv</span>
        <ul>
          <li><span>tiny tv</span></li>
        </ul>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>
    <span>RADIO</span>
    <ul>
      <li>
        <span>mini radio</span>
      </li>
      <li>
        <span>Tiny LCD</span>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>
    <span>Stereo</span>
  </li>
  <li>
    <span>Joe the Plumber</span>
    <ul>
      <li>
        <span>Joe the Plumber</span>
        <ul>
          <li>
            <span>Joe the Plumber</span>
            <ul>
              <li>
                <span>Joe the Plumber</span>
              </li>
            </ul>
          </li>
        </ul>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Gorgeous. It would've been perfect if you had broken out all of the HTML crap to a couple of separate functions, to keep the algorithm pure. But it's still pretty nifty as it is. –  Gutza Apr 16 '13 at 23:10
    
@Gutza Thanks! That's the downside with not using recursion, it's much more difficult to abstract out the code that generates the html... at least in a nice way. Where -- as you know -- you'd just wrapper the recursive call with <ul> or <li> when recursive. (+1) I totally agree recursing is the better way to go :) –  pebbl Apr 17 '13 at 11:17
    
Unfortunately, I came to realize that this method incurs all penalties of recursion (which makes sense, since it's in fact the same thing, as you correctly point out in the introduction). It looks cleaner than the indexes mess, but you get a lot more overhead (of course, you could use pointers instead of cloning each array layer, but you could do the same with recursion as well, so no real joy there). –  Gutza Apr 17 '13 at 12:24
    
@Gutza not sure if you're aware (it took me a while to find out) but PHP actually employs copy-on-write logic, which means that passing references--just to avoid 'copying' values--would not actually improve performance as long as you only ever read from the data. However it'd probably improve performance of my code above, considering I'm using writes.. I specifically avoided using references however as they generally confuse people and affect readability.. in actual fact I think recursion would be faster than the above, but not faster than nextSibling and parent references as you state. –  pebbl Apr 18 '13 at 13:38
    
I don't think anyone's avoiding recursion for speed -- as far as I know, people avoid it because they don't have the resources (i.e. memory) for the unavoidable overhead. Are you sure PHP uses COW for generic data types? I know it uses references for objects, but I had no idea it also used references internally for reads; that'd be pretty cool. –  Gutza Apr 19 '13 at 0:15
show 1 more comment

If you want to avoid recursion, you need each element to know what's its parent, first child and next sibling. There simply is no other way to do it, except searching on each iteration, which is horribly expensive.

You could theoretically rewrite your tree in such a fashion that it would lend itself to traversing like so:


function traverseTree($tree)
{
    $cnode = $tree[0];
    $process = true;
    while($cnode !== NULL) {
       if ($process)
         makeHtmlListItem($cnode);

       if ($cnode->child !== NULL && $process) {
         $process = true;
         $cnode = $cnode->child;
       } elseif ($pnode->next !== NULL) {
         $process = true;
         $cnode = $cnode->next;
       } else {
         // This is where we satisfy the exit condition, after we bubble up
         // upon processing the last top level branch
         $cnode = $cnode->parent;
         $process = false;
       }
    }
}

Of course, that would mean you'd have to prepare the tree programatically beforehand, because with a static definition you can't end up with both the child and the parent properties set.

Later edit: actually, there is a way, but it's so ugly I don't even want to think about it. You'd have to store an array containing indexes for each level, and incrementing each of those in turn, until you finish traversing the whole thing. The stuff of nightmares.

share|improve this answer
    
nightmares. Right^^ See my code^^ It was a nightmare to write it xD –  bwoebi Apr 16 '13 at 21:51
    
@bwoebi: I didn't mean the writing. I meant the reading and maintaining. –  Gutza Apr 16 '13 at 21:53
    
the three things are nightmares. –  bwoebi Apr 16 '13 at 21:55
    
Won't I have to implement a linked list to do that? –  raam86 Apr 16 '13 at 21:56
1  
@raam86: Actually, the linked list is not at all recursive -- in fact, it's the only sane way to avoid recursivity. bwoebi's answer (or something along those lines) is the correct solution to your strict specification, but it's a horrible solution to use in practice, as you can plainly see from what the code looks like, and from the number of debugging iterations necessary to make it work. –  Gutza Apr 16 '13 at 22:10
show 3 more comments
$counter = array(-1);
$depth = 0;
echo "<ul>";

while ($depth > -1) {
    $tmptree = new stdClass;
    $tmptree->childs = $tree; // little hack to not have to do in the for loop: if (!$i) $tmptree = $tmptree[...]; else $tmptree = $tmptree->childs[...];
    for ($i = 0; $i <= $depth; $i++) {
        if ($i == $depth && !isset($tmptree->childs[++$counter[$i]])) {
            echo "</ul>",$i?"</li>":"";
            $depth--;
            continue 2;
        }
        $tmptree = $tmptree->childs[$counter[$i]];
    }

    $topItem = makeHtmlListItem($tmptree);
    $pos = strpos($topItem, '</li>');
    $newItem = substr($topItem,0 , $pos);
    echo $newItem;

    if (isset($tmptree->childs)) {
        echo "<ul>";
        $counter[++$depth] = -1;
    }
}

This little snippet stores where you are in some array and your depth ($counter and $depth). Then it goes deeper and deeper until it finds an end, then goes back.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but it doesn't work. The output is wrong. it does not print all categories and doesn't go full depth. –  raam86 Apr 16 '13 at 21:44
    
@raam86 Are you sure that you have my newest version? Before there were errors there. And what's the output? (for me it works locally...) –  bwoebi Apr 16 '13 at 21:48
    
Yes I replaced your code with mind and I get *TV -> mini radio *stereo *joe the plumber –  raam86 Apr 16 '13 at 21:58
    
...and here comes the nightmare. :) –  Gutza Apr 16 '13 at 22:00
    
@raam86 fixed now.... –  bwoebi Apr 16 '13 at 22:02
show 3 more comments

I wrote program that uses data structure similar to yours. You should be able to adapt the code below to your needs easily.

<?php    

$arr = array(
    array(
        "name" => "lvl1",
        "childs" => array(
            array(
                "name" => "lvl2.1",
                "childs" => array(
                    array(
                        "name" => "lvl3.1",
                        "childs" => array()
                    ),
                    array(
                        "name" => "lvl3.2",
                        "childs" => array()
                    )
                )
            ),
            array(
                "name" => "lvl2.2",
                "childs" => array(
                    array(
                        "name" => "lvl3.3",
                        "childs" => array()
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    )
);


// current index at each level
$i = array(0);

// current array at each level
$cur = array($arr);


$lvl = 0;
while(TRUE) {
    // iterate over childless nodes at current level
    while(!$cur[$lvl][$i[$lvl]]["childs"]) {    
        echo $cur[$lvl][$i[$lvl]]["name"]."\n";
        ++$i[$lvl];
        // if ran out of nodes at current level
        while($i[$lvl] >= count($cur[$lvl])) {
            // and not at level 0
            if($lvl == 0) break 3;
            // move to next node one level above the current one
            ++$i[--$lvl];
        }
    }
    // descend until you hit the childless node
    while($cur[$lvl + 1] = $cur[$lvl][$i[$lvl]]["childs"]) {
        echo $cur[$lvl][$i[$lvl]]["name"]."\n";
        $lvl++;
        // start with first node at each level you descend to
        $i[$lvl] = 0;
    };
};
share|improve this answer
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