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I've been getting weird compile errors all over the place in a simple hunter/prey simulation (mostly because the professor hasn't explained the syntax for inherited classes and virtual functions very well) and I'm completely stuck on one issue. In this program, "Creatures" (an abstract class with "Hunter" and "Prey" children) walk around a "Grid" class in a Move(), Breed(), Die() cycle.

I'm getting the following errors: "C2027: use of undefined type 'Creature'" and "C2227: left of '->face' must point to class/struct/union/generic type" at the line specified in below (all my code's in the header because several students were getting unresolved externals in another project and the professor told us to just put it all in the headers). Let me know if I need to post more code.

I've gotten several other errors that I couldn't explain before this that seemed to be solved through a seemingly random combination of adding/removing included headers and pre-declaring classes, but an actual explanation of what's going wrong would be much appreciated so I'm not just flailing in the dark until it works. I understand the concept of what we're trying to do and even how to go about it for the most part, but as I mentioned, we didn't spend any time on the syntax of how to properly set up multiple files so that everyone works smoothly so any detailed explanation of how this should be done would be greatly appreciated.

Grid.h

#ifndef GRID_H
#define GRID_H

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
#include <ctime>
#include "Constants.h"
#include "creature.h"
using namespace std;

class Creature;

class Grid
{
public:
    Creature* grid[MAX_X][MAX_Y];

    Grid() //Initalizes the grid and spawns random creatures
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < MAX_X; i++)
            for(int j = 0; j < MAX_Y; j++)
                grid[i][j] = NULL;

    }

    void Move() //Tells each creature on the grid to move
    {
        //Call creature.Move() on each cell (if not NULL)
    }

    void Breed() //Tells each creature to breed (if it can)
    {
        //Call creature.Breed() on each cell (if not NULL)
    }

    void Kill()  //Tells each creature to die (if it's old)
    {
        //Call creature.Die() on each cell (if not NULL)
    }

    char** Snapshot()  //Creates a char array "snapshot" of the board
    {
        //Produces a 2D char array of the grid for display
    }

    Creature* Get(Coords here)  //Returns a pointer to the object at the specified position
    {
        return grid[here.x][here.y];
    }

    char Occupant(Coords here) //Returns the character of the specified position
    {
        if(!Get(here))
            return FACE_EMPTY;
        Creature* temp = Get(here);
        return temp->face;  //*** ERRORS APPEAR HERE ***
    }

    void Clear(Coords here)  //Deletes the object at the specified position
    {
        if(Get(here))
            delete Get(here);
        grid[here.x][here.y] = NULL;
    }
};

#endif // GRID_H

creature.h

#ifndef CREATURE_H
#define CREATURE_H

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
#include <ctime>
#include "Constants.h"
#include "coords.h"
#include "grid.h"
using namespace std;

class Grid;

class Creature
{
public:
    Grid* theGrid;
    Coords position;
    int stepBreed;
    int stepHunger;
    char face;

    Creature(Grid* _grid, Coords _position, char _face)  //Constructor
    {
        theGrid = _grid;
        position = _position;
        face = _face;
        stepBreed = stepHunger = 0;
    }

    virtual Coords Move() = 0;  //Allows the child to define it's own movement
    virtual Coords Breed() = 0;  //Allows the child to define it's own breeding
    virtual bool Starve() = 0;  //Allows the child to starve of its own accord
};

#endif // CREATURE_H
share|improve this question
    
Creature is an incomplete type where you're using it. Consider moving that member function of Grid to Grid.cpp, where you can include the Creature.h official header file or class definition. – WhozCraig Apr 16 '13 at 22:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your use of class Creature at the top of the file seems to indicate that you don't have access to the complete definition of Creature in this file. That makes it impossible for the compiler to do the -> operation on it - it doesn't know what the members of that class are! You need to have a complete definition of Creature in the same translation unit as this code. That is, Creature needs to be a complete type if you want to use it in this way.

Edit: Thanks for posting creature.h. Your problem (as mentioned in the comments below) is that you have a circular dependency problem. creature.h includes grid.h and vice versa. You'll need to break one of those links to get things working properly. In this case, removing #include "grid.h" from creature.h should do the trick - no code in creature.h depends on Grid being a complete type.

share|improve this answer
    
How would I correct this while keeping the creature class in it's own file? If I remove that pre-declaration then I get a ton of "missing type specifier" errors. I thought including the header with the Creature class was all I needed in order to utilize it. – Farlo Apr 16 '13 at 22:14
    
@Fario Looks to me that there's not much wrong with this header file. The problem is in the creature.h file. Why doesn't that make the definition of Creature available? Perhaps you could edit the question and add that file. – john Apr 16 '13 at 22:33
    
Added it. Does it have something to do with including the grid in this file? As I said, I'm not really sure what should be included and/or pre-declared when, any explanantion or link to one would be fantastic for future reference. – Farlo Apr 16 '13 at 23:11
    
@Farlo, You have a circular #include problem. creature.h includes grid.h and vice versa. You'll need to break one of those links to have things work. – Carl Norum Apr 17 '13 at 0:09
    
That seems to have worked, although I'm a little confused as to how. As you said, the Creature functions don't require a complete Grid class at the moment, but the child Hunter/Prey Move(), Breed(), Die()will need to access Grid's `Clear()' and re-assign the grid values, won't this cause the same problem in reverse or does Creature's pre-declaration of Grid account for this? – Farlo Apr 17 '13 at 0:46

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