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This was originally a question about the Worklight documentation, it transpires that my real question is about JQuery's Deferred/Promise API and the promise.then() function.

Context:

The documentation for the 5.0.6 JsonRestStore API gives examples of using the new Promise capability offering two possible formulations.

someFunction.then( 
             successCallback,
             errorCallback,
             optionalProgressCallback);

And

 someFunction().then(successCallback).fail(errorCallback)

These two approaches seem, as comments and answers state, effectively the same.

My puzzle is that the JQuery documentation states that then() returns a "new promise".

hence in the second case we are coding:

  var p1 = someFunction();
  var p2 = p1.then(successCallback);
  p2.fail(errorCallback);

I've also seen folks set up a "chain" of actions like this:

  someFunction().then(action2).then(action3).then(action4);

setting up a chain of asynchronous actions. So my question becomes what is the relationship between the promises p1 and p2 in the example above. How does that relate to the chain idea?

--- edited to reference the answer ---

Thanks to cnandreu: the key point is that "errors are propagated down a promise chain until an error handler is found." The answer is explained nicely here.

share|improve this question
    
Both pieces of code do the same. –  Manolo Carrasco Moñino Apr 17 '13 at 14:44
    
@Manolo, functionally I agree, it works. But what's actually going on? Somehow p1.then(good, error), which is the same as p1.fail(error) and p2.fail(error) are having the same effect, p1 and p2 are clearly related - how? –  djna Apr 17 '13 at 18:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
var p1 = someFunction();
var p2 = p1.then(successCallback);
p2.fail(errorCallback);

So my question becomes what is the relationship between the promises p1 and p2 in the example above. How does that relate to the chain idea?

Promises are a way of handling asynchronous code, here's a quick video and article that explains them. someFunction() is going to do an async task, when it finishes it (i.e. gets resolved) it executes the successCallback and if that fails (ie. is rejected) it executes the errorCallback. The relationship is that p2 is a promise that will get executed only when p1 gets rejected. Think of p1.then(win, fail) and p1.then(win).fail(fail) as two ways of writing the same thing.

The original question was probably referring to the following:

A promise object is returned after a JSONStore asynchronous operation is called (find, add, remove, and so on). [...] The [JSONStore.add, JSONStore.find, etc.] failure callback, passed as either the second parameter of .then or the first parameter of .fail returns an error object, [...]

from the JSONStore Documentation. The documentation is specific to the JSONStore API, we refer readers to the jQuery documentation to learn about how promises work in general (see jQuery's API documentation for more details.).

Here's an example:

var collections = {
        people : {
            searchFields : {name: 'THIS_SHOULD_PRODUCE_AN_ERROR'}
        }
    };

WL.JSONStore.init(collections)

.then(function(res){
    //the code here should not be called because we expect to fail
    console.log(typeof res === 'object' ? JSON.stringify(res) : res);
})

.fail(function(err){
    console.log(err.toString());
});

The output is:

{"src":"initCollection","err":-12,"msg":"INVALID_SEARCH_FIELD_TYPES","col":"people","usr":"jsonstore","doc":{},"res":{}}

If we switch to .then(success, failure):

var collections = {
        people : {
            searchFields : {name: 'THIS_SHOULD_PRODUCE_AN_ERROR'}
        }
    };

var success = function(res){
    //the code here should not be called because we expect to fail
    console.log(typeof res === 'object' ? JSON.stringify(res) : res);
};

var failure = function(err){
    console.log(err.toString());
};

WL.JSONStore.init(collections).then(success, failure);

We get the same output:

{"src":"initCollection","err":-12,"msg":"INVALID_SEARCH_FIELD_TYPES","col":"people","usr":"jsonstore","doc":{},"res":{}}

Mix them, pick one or use the deprecated callbacks. All JSONStore examples in the documentation should work as expected. Please update your question with real citations from the documentations and a real example showing that the documentation is wrong and I will update my answer. If it turns out something is wrong, I will do everything possible to fix it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I agree that the WL docs are fine, my mistake in understanding then(). Adjusted question accordingly. –  djna Apr 17 '13 at 15:18
    
Not sure if it's what you're looking for, but I updated my answer. –  cnandreu Apr 17 '13 at 18:01
    
So close ... the point is that p1.then(good, fail) relates to p1. We are effectively writing p1.fail(). But p1.then() returns a new promise: p2. and when we write p1.then().fail() we are effectively writing p2.fail() not p1.fail(), and yet it all just works. Somehow p2.fail() and p1.fail() are having the same effect even though they are separate promises (I assume that they are not really "separate" - but I can't interpret what's happening,) –  djna Apr 17 '13 at 18:17
1  
I think this article could be helpful. Under 'Error Handling': "Because promises know whether they’ve been fulfilled or failed, they can propagate errors, not calling any callback until an error handler is encountered." –  cnandreu Apr 17 '13 at 18:24
    
Yep that's the key missing piece in my understanding. Thanks very much for finding that. –  djna Apr 17 '13 at 20:43

They are functionally the same, this is basically how chaining works right? You have 2 choices, either take the output of one call, and chain it to the next call, or you can save the result in a named variable, and then call the next operation on that named variable.

var str = "   fooo ";
str.trim().indexOf('f');

versus

var str = "   fooo ";
var strTrimmed = str.trim()
strTrimmed.indexOf('f');
share|improve this answer
    
But that's the point, you do have two different strings there: str and strTrimmed. When we do xxx().then().fail() we have two apparently separate promises: p1 returned by xxx() and p2 returned by then(). If we code p1.then(good, bad) we are associating bad with p1. if we code p1.then(good).fail(bad) we are assoiating bad with p2. And yet somehow it has the same effect. –  djna Apr 17 '13 at 18:26

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