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So, to explain my code ->

I have an abstract class of type Employee, it has its own fields, such as names.

I then have the classes Admin, Sales and Manager that extend from Employee. these each have their own fields, such as fixedBonus for admin, percentBonus for Sales and an arraylist of employees for manager.

I then have a driver class which contains an ArrayList of Employees, so it contains Admins, Sales and Managers.

My problem arises with the Arraylist elements. Say I get an employee of class Admin from the ArrayList and try to get to their fixedBonus field with the getter getFixedBonus(), I simply cant. How can I make it so I can use the class specific getters and setters, not just the inherited ones? Here is a copy of my code, where the problem is arising. To be specific the problem is in case 5 and 6 of the switch statement.

private Employee editAnEmployee(Employee emp) {
    boolean exit = false;
    boolean validChoice = false;
    int choice = 0;
    Boolean sure = false; // used in the switch statement
    String newName;
    double newValue;
    Employee admin = new AdminWorker("0", "0", 0, 0, 0); // these are used
    Employee sales = new SalesWorker("0", "0", 0, 0, 0, 0); // to check the
    Employee manager = new Manager("0", "0", 0, 0); // class of the
                                                    // employee
                                                    // being sent
                                                    // in, to edit
                                                    // the fields
                                                    // the employee
                                                    // may hold
    do {
        do {
            validChoice = true;
            emp.toString();
            StdOut.println("Which field would you like to edit?");
            StdOut.println("1) First Name.");
            StdOut.println("2) last Name.");
            StdOut.println("3) Hourly rate.");
            StdOut.println("4) Hours worked in the last week.");
            if (emp.getClass().equals(admin)) {
                StdOut.println("5) Fixed Bonus.");
            } else if (emp.getClass().equals(sales)) {
                StdOut.println("5) Percentage bonus on sales.");
                StdOut.println("6) Value of sales made in the last week.");
            } else if (emp.getClass().equals(manager)) {
                StdOut.println("5) Department.");
            }
            StdOut.println("0) Exit.");
            choice = StdIn.readInt();
            if (choice < 0 || choice > 4) {
                if (emp.getClass().equals(admin) && choice <= 5) {
                    validChoice = true;
                } else if (emp.getClass().equals(sales) && choice <= 6) {
                    validChoice = true;
                } else if (emp.getClass().equals(manager)) {
                    validChoice = true;
                } else {
                    StdOut.println("You entered an invalid number! Try Again...");
                    validChoice = false;
                }
            }
        } while (!validChoice);
        switch (choice) {
        case 0:
            StdOut.println("You are now exiting...");
            exit = true;
            break;
        case 1:
            StdOut.println("The employees first name is: " + emp.getFirstName() + ". What would you like the first name to be now?");
            newName = StdIn.readString();
            StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getFirstName() + " to " + newName +"?(y/n)");
            sure = ynChoice();
            if(sure) emp.setFirstName(newName);
            break;
        case 2:
            StdOut.println("The employees last name is: " + emp.getLastName() + ". What would you like the last name to be now?");
            newName = StdIn.readString();
            StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getLastName() + " to " + newName +"?(y/n)");
            sure = ynChoice();
            if(sure) emp.setLastName(newName);
            break;
        case 3:
            StdOut.println("The employees hourly rate is: " + emp.getHourlyRate() + ". What would you like the hourly rate to be now?");
            newValue = StdIn.readDouble();
            StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getHourlyRate() + " to " + newValue +"?(y/n)");
            sure = ynChoice();
            if(sure) emp.setHourlyRate(newValue);
            break;
        case 4:
            StdOut.println("The employee has worked: " + emp.getHoursWorked() + " hours in the last week. What would you like that to be now?");
            newValue = StdIn.readDouble();
            StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getHoursWorked() + " to " + newValue +"?(y/n)");
            sure = ynChoice();
            if(sure) emp.setHoursWorked(newValue);
            break;
        case 5:
            if (emp.getClass().equals(admin)) {
                StdOut.println("The employees fixed bonus is: " + emp.getFixedBonus() + ". What would you like that to be now?");
                newValue = StdIn.readDouble();
                StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getFixedBonus() + " to " + newValue +"?(y/n)");
                sure = ynChoice();
                if(sure) emp.setHoursWorked(newValue);
            } else if (emp.getClass().equals(sales)) {
                StdOut.println("The employees percentage bonus is: " + emp.getPercentageBonus() + ". What would you like that to be now?");
                newValue = StdIn.readDouble();
                StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getPercentageBonus() + " to " + newValue +"?(y/n)");
                sure = ynChoice();
                if(sure) emp.setHoursWorked(newValue);
            } else if (emp.getClass().equals(manager)) {
                StdOut.println("The employees fixed bonus is: " + emp.getFixedBonus() + ". What would you like that to be now?");
                newValue = StdIn.readDouble();
                StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getFixedBonus() + " to " + newValue +"?(y/n)");
                sure = ynChoice();
                if(sure) emp.setHoursWorked(newValue);
            }
            break;
        case 6:
            StdOut.println("The employees sales in the last week are: " + emp.getLastWeeksSales() + ". What would you like that to be now?");
            newValue = StdIn.readDouble();
            StdOut.println("Are you sure you want to change " + emp.getLastWeeksSales() + " to " + newValue +"?(y/n)");
            sure = ynChoice();
            if(sure) emp.setHoursWorked(newValue);
            break;
        }
    } while (!exit);
    return emp;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Couldn't you just make the abstract Employee class have abstract getter methods? That way, classes extending the Employee class will have to define their own getter behavior. –  Martin Tuskevicius Apr 16 '13 at 22:34
    
Cast the object to the apropriate type. ((AdminWorker) emp).getFixedBonus() –  dnault Apr 16 '13 at 22:39

3 Answers 3

I think the instanceof keyword might be useful in your situation.

ArrayList<Employee> list; // This is initialized and has Employees

for (Employee person: list) {
    if (person instanceof Admin) {
        int fixedBonus = ((Admin) person).getFixedBonus();

        // Do something here
    }
}

Does that answer your question? (You don't need .getClass().equals(), that's what instanceof is for :D )

share|improve this answer
1  
Thats exactly what I needed! Thanks :) –  Glen Keane Apr 16 '13 at 22:54

You should add getFixedBonus() and getPercentBonus() methods to your employee, each returning 0. Then the other worker classes can override them.

Actually, a better technique is to make this an interface and make all of the classes (including Employee) implement the interface. They can then extend a base class that also implements the interface but delivers default values.

public static interface Staff {
  public double getFixedBonus ();
  public double getPercentageBonus ();
  public List<Staff> getMinions();
}

// Base class - no bonus by default.
public static class Worker implements Staff {

  @Override
  public double getFixedBonus() {
    return 0;
  }

  @Override
  public double getPercentageBonus() {
    return 0;
  }

  @Override
  public List<Staff> getMinions() {
    return Collections.EMPTY_LIST;
  }

}

public static class Administrator extends Worker implements Staff {
  double fixedBonus = 2.13;

  @Override
  public double getFixedBonus() {
    return fixedBonus;
  }

}

public static class Salesperson extends Worker implements Staff {
  double percentageBonus = 3.14;

  @Override
  public double getPercentageBonus() {
    return percentageBonus;
  }

}

public static class Manager extends Worker implements Staff {
  List<Staff> minions;

  @Override
  public List<Staff> getMinions() {
    return minions;
  }
}

Do not be tempted by the dark side of using instanceof and casting. You will regret your decision. The whole point of oop is that even when you don't know what kind of objects you are working on but you can still work on them.

share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty fair, especially for something like getPercentageBonus() or getFixedBonus() that makes sense to apply to an Employee. I would argue that it's a little unnecessary to give each employee a getMinions() method, but I suppose it matches what you did for Administrators and Salesmen. Glen, this is probably a better way to do it in the long term. –  mdierker Apr 17 '13 at 5:15

The option that makes your client code a lot more simple (and cleaner - instanceof and casting is ugly) is to declare a default implementation for each specific method in Employee, eg return zero for fixedBonus() in Employee, but overriding it in Sales

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